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Tag:Phillies
Posted on: November 30, 2011 7:48 pm
Edited on: December 1, 2011 3:22 pm
 

Wednesday's rumors: Cespedes, Rollins and more

Hot Stove
By C. Trent Rosecrans

While we all wait for tomorrow's 5:30 p.m. ET coronation of Bobby Valentine as the new manager of the Red Sox, here's the latest roundup of rumors, tidbits and other goings on around the baseball world -- or at least the internet part of it.

South Korean right-hander Chong Tae-Hyon is trying to decide between staying in his home country or joining the Orioles. The 33-year-old has been an All-Star in Korean and is a free agent for the first time. He's gaining plenty of interest in Korea, but would likely get a multi-year deal and a spot on the Orioles' 40-man roster, according to Dan Connolly of the Baltimore Sun. The Orioles are also joining the sweepstakes for Cuban outfielder Yoennis Cespedes, Roch Kubatko of MASNSports.com writes.

Speaking of Cespedes, Nationals general manager Mike Rizzo watched him work out in the Dominican Republic on Tuesday, Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post writes. He notes the Nationals were in attendance at a showcase for Cespedes in early November, before the now-famous video was released.

Marlins outfielder Logan Morrison will meet with a doctor this week to determine if he needs surgery on his right knee, Joe Capozzi of the Palm Beach Post writes. Morrison said he twice ran into walls, including one incident that required five stitches to close a cut.

Infielder Adam Kennedy has agreed to a one-year deal with the Dodgers worth $800,000 to serve as a left-handed bat off the bench and a utility player. Kennedy spent 2010 with the Mariners, hitting .234/.277/.355 with seven home runs. (Orange County Register)

The Giants are looking to move either Jeremy Affeldt or right-hander Ramon Ramirez,Ken Rosenthal of FoxSports.com reports. The team picked up Affeldt's $5 million option for 2012. Ramirez is in his third year of arbitration and should get a bump from the $1.65 million he made last season. Right-hander Sergio Romo is also arbitration-eligible.

If somehow the Cardinals don't end up re-signing Albert Pujols, the team could look to sign Jimmy Rollins to fill its hole at shortstop, Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch writes. However, the team is stuck in a holding pattern until Pujols makes his final decision.

The good news for White Sox fans is that the team is cutting some of its ticket prices -- however that may be in anticipation of "gutting" the team, Mark Gonzales of the Chicago Tribune reports. The team doesn't expect to get Mark Buehrle back and could look to trade lefty John Danks before he reaches free agency.

The Phillies announced they'd signed eight players to minor-league deals with invites to spring training, including right-hander Scott Elarton, infielder Pete Orr and outfielder Scott Podsednik

And, finally, to go back full circle to Valentine and the Red Sox, sources told WEEI.com's Alex Speier that after Terry Francona got the ax, Red Sox officials told at least one player that the team wasn't going to hire "someone like Bobby Valentine." Perhaps they forgot to add, "but maybe the real Bobby Valentine." ESPN.com's Buster Olney wrote that Red Sox players are already none too happy about the hiring, complaining about some of the things Valentine said about them on the air as ESPN's analyst. 

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed. 

Posted on: November 29, 2011 4:01 pm
Edited on: November 29, 2011 4:32 pm
 

Tuesday rumors: Dotel, Thornton and more

Rumor Mill
By Matt Snyder

There's going to be tons of rumor talk this week, as we inch closer to the Winter Meetings next week. That goes without saying. Some stuff will pan out and other rumors will never come to fruition.

Since not every reader is sitting on Twitter all day, we'll pass along as much as we can. Let's run through a quick snapshot of some of the more minor rumors from Tuesday morning and early afternoon. Remember, these are reports from other outlets that we're just passing along. Feel free to believe or ignore whatever you wish.

• Right-handed reliever Octavio Dotel -- who was an important member of the Cardinals bullpen after a midseason trade -- is drawing interest from a handful of teams, reports indicate. MLB.com says the Mets and Cardinals are in the running while FoxSports.com names the Cardinals, Reds and Tigers. Dotel is 38, but posted a high strikeout rate for the Cardinals (11.7 K/9, his best since '08) and threw well in the postseason.

• The White Sox are trying to trade left-handed reliever Matt Thornton, reports Buster Olney of ESPN.com. Thornton is owed $12 million over the course of the next two seasons. The 35-year-old was excellent from 2008-2010 but took a step back in 2011. Of course, if you look at just June 5 to the end of the season, he was back to himself (2.20 ERA, 1.02 WHIP, 44 K in 41 innings).

• The Cubs have interest in Rockies third baseman Ian Stewart (via trade), reports Troy Renck of the Denver Post, though Renck notes the level of "seriousness is unclear." Stewart makes a lot of sense as a trade candidate. Once a top-10 prospect (Baseball America had him as high as fourth in all of baseball), Stewart hit 25 homers for Colorado in 2009. But he's been unable to fix his issues with strikeouts, batting average or consistency and seems to have fallen out of favor. He'd probably come cheap, so the Cubs plugging him at third base -- with Aramis Ramirez headed out via free agency -- could work. Stewart's only 26, so maybe a change of scenery would help.

• The Dodgers are speaking with representatives for Adam Kennedy, reports MLB Trade Rumors. Kennedy would simply serve as a multi-positional backup infielder. The 35-year-old hit .234/.277/.355 last season for the Mariners. He'd be shaky at shortstop, but could handle first, second or third just fine.

• The Marlins are interested in Carlos Guillen, reports Jon Paul Morosi of FoxSports.com. The three-time All-Star is now 36 and has only averaged 72 games a year in the past four seasons due to injury woes. He'd also likely be simply a multi-positional backup or late-innings pinch hitter.

• This isn't a rumor, but we'll throw it in here. The Phillies have released relief pitcher Scott Mathieson so he can pursue a contract in Asia, the club announced via press release.

Hat-tip: MLB Trade Rumors

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 28, 2011 11:39 am
 

Phillies tried to lure Wagner out of retirement



By Matt Snyder

The Phillies really wanted an "established" closer. They wanted one so badly that they called Billy Wagner after the 2011 regular season ended.

“It was after the regular season ... just to see if I was even contemplating coming back or had an itch or anything,” Wagner said (New York Post). “I just told them, ‘No, I do not have an itch.'"

This came well before the Phillies eventually signed Jonathan Papelbon to a four-year, $50 million contract.

Wagner, 40, retired after a sparkling 2010 season -- one in which he made his seventh All-Star team. Wagner served as closer for the Astros, Mets, Phillies and Braves while also setting up for Papelbon in Boston for a half season. With 422 career saves, he's fifth on the all-time list behind Mariano Rivera, Trevor Hoffman, Lee Smith and John Franco.

Wagner told the Post he's currently very happy serving simply as a JV baseball coach.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 20, 2011 7:10 pm
Edited on: November 20, 2011 10:33 pm
 

Phillies trade for Ty Wigginton

By Matt Snyder

The Phillies have acquired utility infielder Ty Wigginton from the Rockies for either cash or a player to be named later, the Rockies announced Sunday. Multiple reports indicate the Rockies will pick up half the $4 million Wigginton is due in 2012.

Wigginton, 34, will serve multiple purposes for the Phillies. He's played everywhere but center field, catcher and pitcher in his career. He's best used at first or third base but also serviceable at second. Considering Chase Utley and Placido Polanco missed their fair share of games last season, Wigginton will serve as a good spot starter probably a few times a week when the entire lineup is healthy. He's also capable of playing left field if need be, as Raul Ibanez is a free agent and unlikely to re-sign in Philly.

Hot Stove
And then there's first base. All-Star slugger Ryan Howard ruptured his Achilles tendon on the final play of Game 5 of the NLDS and had surgery after the season. The Phillies believe he'll be ready by the start of the season, but that's awfully aggressive. The Phillies have signed Jim Thome, but he hasn't played first base regularly in years. Wigginton should help the Phillies ease Howard back on the field.

Another layer to consider is that the Phillies have reportedly been very interested in free agent Michael Cuddyer. It's entirely possible they land Cuddyer and just stick him in left field, but his addition definitely isn't near as important now, as Wiggington can serve a similar purpose. Plus, they have to give prospect Domonic Brown an extended look at some point, right? Honestly, I feel like the Wigginton addition means they'll back off Cuddyer. But it's too early to tell.

Wigginton hit .242/.315/.416 with 21 doubles, 15 homers and eight stolen bases in 446 plate appearances last season for Colorado. The Phillies will become the veteran's seventh big-league team in 11 total seasons.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 19, 2011 6:32 pm
 

Arizona Fall League wraps up season

Nolan ArenadoBy C. Trent Rosecrans

The Salt River Rafters wrapped up the Arizona Fall League season with an 9-3 victory over the Surprise Saguaros on Saturday, and with it came a flurry of awards.

Rockies third baseman Nolan Arenado (pictured) won the league's Most Valuable Player Award. The 20-year old, playing for the Rafters, hit safely in 27 of his 30 games, including a 2-for-4 performance with a solo homer in Saturday's championship game. Arrando led the minor leagues with 122 RBI at High-A Modesto in 2011.

Miami outfielder Kevin Mattison won the Dernell Stenson Sportsmanship Award. Mattison tied for the league lead in triples (five) and second in runs scored (29). Mattison was added to the Marlins' 40-man roster on Friday.

Arenado and Mattison were also members of the league's Top Prospects Team.

The entire team:

Outfield

Bryce Harper (Nationals): .333/.400/.636, 6 HR, 26 RBI

Michael Choice (Athletics): .318/.423/.667, 6 HR, 18 RBI

Robbie Grossman (Pirates): .375/.472/625, 7 HR, 22 RBI

Kevin Mattison (Marlins): .349/.433/.624, 6 HR, 23 RBI

Adam Eaton (Diamondbacks): .344/.410/.475, 2 HR, 16 RBI

Wil Myers (Royals): .360/.481/.674, 4 HR, 18 RBI

Third base

Nolan Arenado (Rockies): .388/.423/.636, 6 HR, 33 RBI

Mike Olt (Rangers): .349/.433/.764, 13 HR 43 RBI

Shortstop

Junior Lake (Cubs): .296/.352/.548, 5 HR, 21 RBI

Brandon Crawford (Giants): .276/.315/.414, 2 HR, 12 RBI

Second base

Joe Panik (Giants): .323/.394/.473, 2 HR, 13 RBI

Brian Dozier (Twins): .296/..358/.454, 3 HR, 22 RBI

First base

Joe Terdoslavich (Braves): .321/.424/.548, 3 HR, 14 RBI

Matt Adams (Cardinals): .250/.258/.475, 4 HR, 19 RBI

Catcher

Christian Bethancourt (Braves): .306/.324/.556, 5 HR, 13 RBI

Derek Norris (Nationals): .276/.367/.382, 2 HR, 11 RBI

Designated hitter

Jedd Gyorko (Padres): .437/.500/.704, 5 HR, 22 RBI

Josh Vitters (Cubs): .360/.383/.540, 4 HR, 17 RBI

Starting pitchers

Danny Hultzen (Mariners): 1-0, 1.40 ERA, 19.1 IP, 18 SO, 5 BB

Terry Doyle (White Sox): 4-0, 1.98 ERA, 27.1 IP, 22 SO, 5 BB

Relievers

Brad Boxberger (Reds): 3 saves, 5.40 ERA, 13.1 IP, 22 SO, 6 BB

Jacob Diekman (Phillies): 2 saves, 0.79 ERA, 11.1 IP, 14 SO, 6 BB

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 18, 2011 8:11 pm
Edited on: November 18, 2011 9:53 pm
 

Report: Sizemore 'close' to deal with Indians

Grady Sizemore

By C. Trent Rosecrans

The Indians turned down their $9 million option on outfielder Grady Sizemore, the two sides are reportedly "close" to a new, one-year deal, FoxSports.com's Ken Rosenthal reports.

Rosenthal said the talks were "serious" with one source saying it was "70-30" and another source said it was "very likely." Rosenthal reports the deal will be for less guaranteed money than his previous deal, but incentives could make it close to the $9 million he could have made in 2012.

"The Indians have come at us with an aggressive offer," Sizemore's agent, Joe Urbon, told ESPN.com's Jerry Crasnick. Urbon added the two sides have "exchanged proposals." 

Sizemore has been limited to just 104 games over the last two seasons with serious knee injuries, undergoing surgery on his right knee on Monday. It was his fourth operation in the past two years, including micro fracture surgery on his left knee in 2010.

Sizemore, 29, hit .224/.285/.422 with 10 home runs and 32 RBI in 71 games in 2011. He won two Gold Gloves and a Silver Slugger while appearing in three All-Star Games from 2006-08. 

In addition to the Indians, the Cubs, Rangers, Giants, Yankees, Phillies, Rockies and Red Sox had reportedly had interest in signing Sizemore.

Keep up with the latest free agent signings with the CBSSports.com free agent tracker. 

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 17, 2011 5:29 pm
Edited on: November 17, 2011 6:43 pm
 

Would expanded playoffs change past results?



By C. Trent Rosecrans

Commissioner Bud Selig wants one more team in the playoffs as soon as the 2012 season, with the two wild card teams facing off in one game to decide which team moves on to the next round. The idea is to expand the playoffs and at the same time giving division winners an advantage over a team that doesn't win its division.

Not only does the extra team mean there's more playoffs, but the wild card teams will have to juggle their rotation to try to get their best pitcher pitch in the one-game playoff.

2011

American League: No baseball fan will forget watching Game 162 for the Rays and Red Sox -- a once-in-a-lifetime finish to the regular season that wouldn't happen under the new format. Of course, it was there only because of the wild card -- something that many people were against when Selig first introduced it. There will still be fantastic finishes -- just not one exactly like there was this year. Not that I was expecting to see anything like that ever again. If the new format eliminates the rule barring teams from the same division playing in the first round, the first-round match ups would have been different, with the Tigers and Rangers meeting in the divisional series instead of the ALCS.

National League: The Cardinals and Braves would have faced off in the one-game playoff, with the winner going on the face the Phillies. Chris Carpenter wouldn't have had to pitch the final game of the regular season and could have been held back for the wild card game.

What would have changed? Maybe Terry Francona would still have a job, but other than that, who knows? The Cardinals wouldn't have had Carpenter for the wild card game, but if they were indeed a team of destiny, who's to say they don't go on and win the whole thing? The American League is a tossup, really, it's tough to say exactly what would have happened.

2010

American League: The Red Sox beat out the White Sox for the second playoff spot and set up yet another Yankees-Red Sox showdown in the one-game wild card.

National League: Atlanta and San Diego would face off for the right to face the seemingly unbeatable Phillies, while the Giants and Reds would have met in the other division series.

What would have changed? Instead of facing the Yankees, the Twins would get the Rangers, but the result probably wouldn't have changed. As for the National League, San Diego was reeling at the end of the season and probably wouldn't have challenged the Braves. However, the Phillies wouldn't have played the Reds in the first round and we wouldn't have gotten Roy Halladay's no-hitter. Or maybe we would have, the Reds had the National League's best offense, so maybe the opponent didn't matter that day.

2009

American League: Instead of just one one-game playoff in the AL, in 2009 there would have been two. Boston and Texas would have been the two wild card teams, but both teams had better records than the Twins and Tigers, who met in a one-game playoff to determine the American League Central champ.

National League: The AL East isn't the only division that can squeeze three teams into the playoffs -- the Rockies and Giants would face each other for the right to play the Dodgers in the NLDS.

What would have changed? Probably little, the Yankees and Phillies would likely face off in the World Series no matter what other teams were in the mix.

2008

American League: The Twins would have been the extra wild card team, facing the 95-win Red Sox for the right to face the Angels

National League: The Brewers and Mets would have had to face off in the wild card game, with the winner getting the 97-win Cubs, while Philadelphia would face Los Angeles in the NLDS instead of the Cubs.

What would have changed? The Red Sox beat the Angels 3-1 in the ALDS, so it's not a stretch to see Boston burning a pitcher and still beating the Angels in that series. The Phillies likely would have gone on to the World Series, but the Cubs may have had a better shot to advance to the NLCS and break some more hearts by failing to reach the World Series.

2007

American League: One one-game playoff not good enough for you? How about a playoff for the playoff? The 94-win Yankees would have to wait a day to see who they'd play in the wild card game, as Seattle and Detroit both finished 88-74.

National League: This time we have a pretty good idea what it would look like -- the Rockies and Padres would face off in a one-game playoff, just as they did anyway. A 13-inning thriller, the Rockies beat the Padres to advance to the NLDS. But instead of playing the Phillies in the first round, the Rockies would have faced the Diamondbacks, who had the best record in the National League with 90 wins.

What would have changed? Probably not too much -- every series was a sweep, meaning the best teams were more or less identified.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 17, 2011 2:00 pm
Edited on: November 17, 2011 4:17 pm
 

Clayton Kershaw wins NL Cy Young Award

Clayton Kershaw

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Dodgers left-hander Clayton Kershaw added the National League Cy Young Award to his pitching Triple Crown on Thursday, beating Phillies' right-hander Roy Halladay to win his first Cy Young.

The 23-year-old Kershaw led the National League with 21 wins, a 2.28 ERA and 248 strikeouts. He also led the league with a 0.977 WHIP, was named to his first All-Star team and won the Gold Glove -- in all, a pretty good year. He received 27 of the 32 first-place votes in voting done by the Baseball Writers Association of America. Halladay received four first-place votes, while fourth-place finisher Ian Kennedy received the other. Halladay's teammate, Cliff Lee, finished third, but didn't receive a first-place vote.

Halladay, 34, missed out on his third Cy Young Award, winning it in 2010 for the Phillies and in 2003 while in Toronto. Halladay went 19-6 with a 2.35 ERA and 208 strikeouts, leading the league with eight complete games. He also led the National League in ERA+ with a 164. ERA+ measures a pitcher's ERA against the league average and takes park factors into effect.

Three Phillies finished in the top fiive, with left-hander Cole Hamels finishing fifth. In all, four Giants received votes, with Tim Lincecum finishing sixth, Matt Cain eighth and Madison Bumgarner and Ryan Vogelsong tying for 11th with one fifth-place vote each.

In the end, though, it came down to Kershaw and Halladay. Either was a good choice, but Kershaw's Triple Crown may have pushed him over the top. He was one of the bright spots -- along with Matt Kemp -- of a pretty dark year for the Dodgers. Even though Kershaw made his first All-Star team with a 9-4 record and 3.03 ERA in the first half, he won the Cy Young in the second half, when he went 12-2 with a 1.31 ERA. He also dominated at Dodger Stadium, going 12-1 with a 1.69 ERA in 16 starts at home, with his only home loss coming on April 16, his second home start of the season.

"I always dreamed about playing in the big leagues. I never dreamed about doing anything special in the big leagues. I don't think any kid ever does," Kershaw said. "The people I'm now associated with, just by having this award, is something that I never thought would ever happen."

It is the 10th time a Dodgers pitcher has won the award, joining three-time winner Sandy Koufax, Don Newcombe, Don Drysdale, Mike Marshall, Fernando Valezuela, Orel Hershiser and Eric Gagne. Being left-handed, the comparisons to Koufax have naturally come up, though Kershaw said he was uncomfortable with the comparison.

"I'm still uncomfortable with it. I don't want to have any disrespect for Mr. Koufax. He did it for a long time. He won a lot of awards and he won World Series. He threw no-hitters. Just a lot of things I'm not anywhere close to accomplishing yet," Kershaw said. "I have tremendous respect for him and would never want to ever put myself in the same category as him." 

Previous Cy Young Award winners.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com