Tag:Mark Teixeira
Posted on: June 7, 2011 3:54 pm
Edited on: June 7, 2011 4:05 pm
 

Yankees, AL East dominate AL All-Star voting

Yankees

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Who says that old East Coast bias is limited to the media? Fan voting -- in the American League -- is leaning heavily east, as well.

The latest American League All-Star voting totals have AL East players winning at nine of the 10 positions fans can vote for, with the Yankees taking up the entire infield. The lone outsider is the Rangers' Josh Hamilton, who is third in voting for three outfield spots, behind the Blue Jays' Jose Bautista and New York's Curtis Granderson.

Yankees Russell Martin, Mark Teixeira, Robinson Cano, Alex Rodriguez and Derek Jeter occupy the top spots around the horn.

David Ortiz has overtaken Texas' Michael Young as the leading vote-getter at designated hitter.

Complete results are available at MLB.com.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: June 7, 2011 3:53 pm
This entry has been removed by the administrator.

Post Deleted by Administrator

This message has been removed by the administrator.

Posted on: June 7, 2011 3:52 pm
This entry has been removed by the administrator.

Post Deleted by Administrator

This message has been removed by the administrator.

Posted on: June 4, 2011 9:52 pm
Edited on: June 5, 2011 5:29 pm
 

Best first-round picks of the last decade



By C. Trent Rosecrans

With the MLB Draft beginning Monday night at 7 p.m. ET, the Eye on Baseball crew is going to look at the best -- and worst -- first-round draft picks by each team in the last 10 years. 

With the way the baseball draft goes, there are plenty of busts in the first round every year, but there are a lot of great players in the game that were drafted in the first round and the supplemental first round. Tomorrow we'll look at the misses, but for today, here are the hits.

Arizona Diamondbacks: Most first overall picks make the majors and many (Alex Rodrgiuez, Ken Griffey, Chipper Jones) find their way to superstardom. Justin Upton may not be a superstar yet, but the first overall pick of the 2005 draft already has one All-Star appearance under his belt and will probably have more to come.

Atlanta Braves: With the 14th pick in the 2007 draft, the Braves took a local kid, outfielder Jason Heyward. Nice pick.

MLB Draft

Baltimore Orioles: Matt Wieters is close to taking this spot, but for now it's still Nick Markakis, who was taken with the seventh overall pick of the 2003 draft out of Young Harris College in Georgia.

Boston Red Sox: The Red Sox had five picks in the first round and the supplemental first round in 2005, and as good as Jacoby Ellsbury and Jed Lowrie are, the pick here is right-hander Clay Buchholz, taken 42nd overall out of Angelina College.

Chicago Cubs: While his name is now a cautionary tale, it's easy to forget just how good Mark Prior was before arm trouble. Drafted with the second pick of the 2001 draft, he won six games in 2002 and 18 in 2003, his best season. Overall, Prior was 42-29 with a 3.51 ERA.

Gordon BeckhamChicago White Sox: Even with his struggles last year and this season, Gordon Beckham has been a productive player for the White Sox after he was taken with the eighth overall pick in the 2008 draft.

Cincinnati Reds: Taken out of high school with the 12th overall pick in 2005, Jay Bruce is the reigning National League Player of the Month and only seems to be getting better at 24. He already has 85 homers in his career, including a National League-best 17 this season.

Cleveland Indians: How bad have the Indians' first-round picks been the last decade? The 18 players taken by Cleveland in the first round and the supplemental first round over the last 10 years have collected just 506 games in the majors, 334 for Cleveland. Lonnie Chisenhall (29th overall in 2008) may eventually be their best in this list, but for right now it's the Orioles' Jeremy Guthrie, who at least has 40 big-league wins.

Colorado Rockies: While the Indians' choice was tough, the Rockies' wasn't -- Troy Tulowitzki was taken with the seventh overall pick in 2005.

Detroit Tigers: With the second pick in 2004, the Tigers took Justin Verlander.

Florida Marlins: The team's best pick of the last decade came in the fourth round of the 2002 draft when it took high school pitcher Josh Johnson, but as far as first-round picks, their best is right-hander Chris Volstad, taken with the 16th pick of the 2005 draft.

Chris BurkeHouston Astros: The Astros didn't have first-round picks in 2003, 2004 and 2007 and haven't had much production from any of them. There's really just two choices, Chris Burke (10th overall, 2001) and Jason Castro (10th overall, 2008). Castro has potential, but is out this season and has played in just 67 big league games, so the pick is Burke, who played in parts of six seasons with three teams, but his 18th-inning walk-off homer (left) to clinch the 2005 NLDS against the Braves is one of the franchise's signature moments.

Kansas City Royals: This choice could be much more difficult in five years, but for now it's pretty easy -- Zack Greinke. The Royals selected him sixth overall in the 2002 draft and he won the American League Cy Young Award in 2009.

Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim: Jered Weaver was the 12th pick of the 2004 draft.

Los Angeles Dodgers: The Dodgers took lefty Clayton Kershaw with the seventh pick of the 2006 draft out of a Texas high school.

Milwaukee Brewers: This could change in a couple of years, but for now, Prince Fielder (seventh overall, 2002) leads Ryan Braun (fifth overall, 2005). Fielder is a free agent this offseason, while Braun is under contract through 2020.

Minnesota Twins: There were those who questioned the pick of hometown boy Joe Mauer with the first pick in the 2001 draft instead of Prior. Not anymore.

New York Mets: Fred Wilpon may not think he's a franchise player, but David Wright is the team's best first-round pick in the last decade, taken with the 38th overall pick in 2001.

New York Yankees: The Yankees have plenty of first-round picks on their roster, although few were their picks. Two key pitchers, starter Phil Hughes (23rd overall in 2004) and reliever Joba Chamberlain (41st overall in 2006), were Yankee picks. The pick here is Chamberlain, who has allowed fewer runs in a similar number of innings and is currently pitching.

Oakland Athletics: A chapter of the book Moneyball focuses on the 2002 MLB Draft and Billy Beane's distaste of drafting high school players. In the book, the team is excited the Brewers take a player they won't touch (Fielder), and the team also doesn't want Zack Greinke, Scott Kazmir, Cole Hamels or Matt Cain -- all high school player. But they get the man they want the most, Nick Swisher at No. 16. It's a good pick, as is Joe Blanton at 24 -- but it's hardly Greinke, Fielder, Hamels or Cain. The team also picked Jeremy Brown, a catcher out of Alabama, and Mark Teahen in the supplemental round. 

Philadelphia Phillies: Another pick from the Moneyball draft, the pick after the A's took Swisher, the Phillies snatched up Hamels, the left-hander from a California high school with the 17th pick.

Pittsburgh Pirates: The 2005 draft featured six players listed as center fielders taken in the first round -- and all six have made the big leagues. The second one taken was the Pirates' Andrew McCutchen with the 11th overall pick. The others were Cameron Maybin (10), Bruce (12), Trevor Crowe (14), Ellsbury (23) and Colby Rasmus (28).

San Diego Padres: The Padres may have had one of the biggest busts of the last decade in Matt Bush, the first overall pick in 2004 draft, but he's not been their only bad pick. The best of the lot was Khalil Greene, taken No. 13 in 2002, who had a promising start of his career, but his troubles with social anxiety disorder drove him from the game. Still, he's the Padres' career leader in homers by a shortstop with 84.

San Francisco Giants: Nine teams passed on the right-hander out of Washington, some scared off by his funky motion and small stature. Tim Lincecum proved them wrong.

Evan LongoriaSeattle Mariners: Adam Jones (37th pick in 2003) played in just 73 games for the Mariners, but was named an All-Star and won a Gold Glove with the Orioles in 2009.

St. Louis Cardinals: With a compensation pick for the Red Sox signing Edgar Renteria, the Cardinals used the 28th pick of the 2005 draft to take Rasmus out of an Alabama High School.

Tampa Bay Rays: Were Luke Hochevar and Greg Reynolds better than Evan Longoria? The Royals and Rockies took those two right-handers with the first two picks of the 2006 draft, leaving Longoria (left) for the Rays.

Texas Rangers: Funny story here -- in 2001 I was working at the Athens Banner-Herald in Georgia and was covering the NCAA Regional in Athens when a Teixeira-led Georgia Tech squad was bounced from the tournament. After his last game, a kid from the student radio station asked Teixeira if he thought his poor showing in the regional would hurt his draft status. The Georgia Tech coach, Danny Hall, took the microphone before Teixeira could answer and said, "No." So did the Rangers, who took him fifth overall.

Toronto Blue Jays: The Blue Jays took lefty Ricky Romero out of Cal State Fullerton with the sixth pick in the 2005 draft.

Washington Nationals: Another pick that could change with the emergence of Stephen Strasburg and Bryce Harper, but that's still several years away because of the fourth pick of the 2005 draft,  Ryan Zimmerman.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: June 1, 2011 3:45 pm
Edited on: June 1, 2011 4:03 pm
 

AL All-Star balloting update: Bautista tops all



By Matt Snyder


Tuesday, Major League Baseball unveiled the first update on the All-Star balloting for the National League, so Wednesday we found out the American League update. Needless to say, non-Yankees fans won't be happy, but we'll get to that in a second. The big story is that the fans nailed the top overall vote-getter (that goes for both leagues). Jose Bautista of the Blue Jays leads the majors in runs, home runs, on-base percentage, slugging percentage, OPS, OPS-plus and total bases. You can add top vote-getter to the list for now, because he's gathered 1,261,659 votes. If this holds, he'd become the first Blue Jays player ever to receive the most votes and the first to start the game since Carlos Delgado in 2003.

As things stand now, here are the would-be AL starters: Russell Martin, Mark Teixeira, Robinson Cano, Derek Jeter, Alex Rodriguez, Curtis Granderson -- yes, those are actually the leaders in votes; I didn't accidentally start listing the Yankees' starters -- Jose Bautista, Josh Hamilton and Michael Young (DH).

So, yeah. Six Yankees starters if this was the final version. Here are some observations:

- Asdrubal Cabrera trails Jeter by about 260,000 votes at short. I guess I'm not shocked for several reasons. First of all, the voting began pretty early in the season and Cabrera was a relative unknown when it started. Secondly, you have Jeter and the whole chase for 3,000 hits thing going on. Third, it's the Yankees. If this is a lifetime achievement thing, OK, but if we're looking at just 2011, it's egregious. Cabrera's been the big offensive force for the most surprising team in baseball -- one that has the best record in the AL.

- Teixeira's having a big power year and him starting the game wouldn't be completely undeserved, but I'd rather go with Adrian Gonzalez or Miguel Cabrera there. If you have a problem with Cabrera's off-field issues in the spring, well, vote for Gonzalez or Tex.

- Third could shape up to be a real good battle between A-Rod, Adrian Beltre and Kevin Youkilis -- who were all probably helped by the injury to Evan Longoria.

- Martin is the correct selection behind the plate. Oh, and Joe Mauer's second in voting (tsk, tsk).

- Granderson certainly deserves to start and Cano probably does as well. So Yankees haters need to lay off these guys.

- The outfield voting isn't awesome, that's for sure. Hamilton has been hurt most of the season and sits third. Matt Joyce isn't even in the top 15, nor are Carlos Quentin, Adam Jones, Michael Brantley or Alex Gordon. But Ichiro Suzuki, Nelson Cruz and Carl Crawford are all in contention.

View the full voting results by clicking here.

There are obviously a lot more issues, but it's the initial ballot release and many of the votes were cast when it was released without having a good grasp of how the 2011 season would turn out. Fortunately, there's still time to support your guys and rectify any problems you might have. Voting doesn't end until the end of June.

Click here to cast an online ballot.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: May 19, 2011 5:30 pm
 

On Deck: Posada in lineup, field



By C. Trent Rosecrans

Jorge PosadaPOSADA IN THE FIELD -- Jorge Posada will use a mitt in a game for the first time this season, but it'll be the first baseman's type, not the catcher's model. Posada will start his 16th career game at first base, while Mark Teixeira moves to designated hitter. Posada, for the record, will be batting seventh. Because of Wednesday's 15-inning game, the Yankees didn't take batting practice or infield, which Posada said he'd like to have gotten in advance of his first start at the position (or any real position) this season. Posada played some first in spring training and has been taking grounders there this season. Yankees at Orioles, 7:05 p.m. ET (Watch live)

Andre EthierSTRUGGLING -- Andre Ethier is no stranger to streaks this season, lodging a 30-game hitting streak earlier this season. However, his current streak is nothing to brag about. Over the last five games, he's 0 for 17 with five strikeouts. He's just 1 for 6 in his career against tonight's starter, San Francisco lefty Madison Bumgarner. Ethier is hitting just .235/.264/.314 against lefties this season, with all four of his homers coming off right-handers. Since hitting in his 30th straight game on May 6, Ethier is 7 for 42, hitting .167/.239/.238. Giants at Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. ET (Watch live)

Aaron HarangDR. JEKYLL AND MR. HARANG -- One of the feel-good stories of April was the return of Aaron Harang. Now with his hometown Padres and away from homer-happy Great American Ball Park, Harang looked like the 2006-07 version of the right-hander, going 4-0 with a 1.88 ERA in his first four starts as a Padre. The Next four starts, well, not so good -- 1-2 with an 8.46 ERA. Tonight he faces a familiar foe, Milwaukee, in his new spacious Petco home. Harang is 5-5 with a 4.65 ERA in 21 starts against the Brewers, but he may fare better when some of those Ryan Braun and Prince Fielder shots miss the seats. Brewers at Padres, 10:05 p.m. ET (Watch live)

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: April 25, 2011 8:51 pm
Edited on: April 25, 2011 9:11 pm
 

No-hitter alert: Humber through 6

By C. Trent Rosecrans

UPDATE: Alex Rodriguez's grounder up the middle with one out in the seventh broke up Humber's no-hit bid. After getting Curtis Granderson to ground out to start the inning, Humber walked Mark Teixeira before giving up the single to Rodriguez. Humber struck out Robinson Cano and then got Nick Swisher to ground out to end the inning and preserve Chicago's 1-0 lead after seven innings.

------

Philip HumberIn our most surprising no-hitter watch so far this season, White Sox right-hander Philip Humber has held the Yankees without a hit through six innings in New York.

Humber, a first-round pick out of Rice in 2004 that has played for the Mets, is making his fourth start of the season and sixth of his career. Humber, who was part of the Johan Santana in 2008, pitched for the Royals last season and was claimed off waivers by the Athletics in December, only to be waived by Oakland in January when he was claimed by Chicago.

Humber hit a batter and walked one, while striking out four.

Yankees starter A.J. Burnett has been almost as good, allowing a run on two hits. The White Sox lead 1-0 in the seventh.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: April 7, 2011 5:16 pm
Edited on: April 7, 2011 6:42 pm
 

Nishioka suffers broken fibula

Tsuyoshi Nishioka
UPDATED (5:55 p.m. EST)
By C. Trent Rosecrans

The Yankees' Nick Swisher not only broke up a double play on his take-out slide of Twins second baseman Tsuyoshi Nishioka in Thursday's Yankee victory, but also broke Nishioka's left fibula.

Nishioka has been placed on the disabled list and Luke Hughes has been recalled to take his roster spot, according to a press release from the Twins. There's no timetable for Nishioka's return yet. He will see the team's doctors tomorrow, Kelsie Smith of the St. Paul Pioneer-Press tweets .

The slide, coming on a grounder by Mark Teixeira, appeared to be clean, and no Twins player objected to it, USA Today 's Bob Nightengale tweets . Swisher talked to Nishioka, but Nishioka said it wasn't necessary, that it was a completely clean play.

"The first thing I said was, ‘I’m sorry, man. I thought you were going to jump,” Swisher told reporters, including Christensen . “And he said, ‘It was my fault. I should have gotten out of the way.’ I was just trying to break up a double play. I didn't  mean to do that. Especially with a guy like that, just trying to make his mark over here.”

It looked for a minute that Nishioka would stay in the game, but he was then helped off the field with his arms around a trainer and his interpreter, putting little-to-no weight on his leg.

Nishioka is hitting .217/.280/.261 in his first year with the Twins. The Twins won with a bid in excess of $5 million in posting and signed him to a three-year, $9.25 million contract. Nishioka, 26, led Japan's Pacific League with a .346 average. 

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb   on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com