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Tag:Carl Crawford
Posted on: October 14, 2011 3:35 pm
Edited on: October 14, 2011 7:20 pm
 

Red Sox owner Henry was against Crawford signing

By Matt Snyder

The Red Sox offseason soap opera added another chapter Friday afternoon when owner John Henry went on a local radio station to discuss his team. The whole thing was a bad idea if you ask me, but hey, it's his organization. He has the right to constantly keep it in the news, even if it's for negative reasons.

Click here to listen to the full interview via CBS Boston.

Red Sox soap opera
The big news from the appearance was easily Henry saying he was not supportive of signing left fielder Carl Crawford last offseason. Crawford signed a seven-year, $142 million contract and then went on to easily have the worst season of his career. Henry is the owner -- you know, the guy who actually pays the players. If he didn't want to spend $142 million, he could have said he didn't want to spend $142 million when the deal actually happened. Henry later said in the interview that ownership doesn't discuss players, only "financial issues." So it's possible he just told his personnel guys how much money they could spend and stayed out of everything. It just seems odd to try and save face for a signing when he's the top dog.

While we're here, it's a bit absurd how much ire general manager Theo Epstein has drawn for the Crawford signing. Yes, he was awful in 2011, but no one had a crystal ball. Here is what Crawford's average season was from 2004-2010: .301/.344/.461, 27 doubles, 13 triples, 14 home runs, 73 RBI, 95 runs, 49 stolen bases. He was also a Gold Glove left fielder and only 29 years old. Considering he'd be moving to a better lineup and better hitter's park, there was every reason to believe he'd be even better. You can say they overpaid for those numbers, and they probably did, but that's what the Yankees and Red Sox do. The fact that Crawford was a bust in '11 is on Crawford, not Epstein, Henry or anyone else. And it will honestly be pretty surprising if Crawford doesn't bounce back with a good season in 2012.

Anyway, here are some more highlights of the interview:

• On the Boston Globe article that said manager Terry Francona was distracted by marital and prescription drug problems during the season: “It’s reprehensible that was written about in the first place,” said Henry (CBS Boston). “If it’s someone within the team, and that’s what it says in the newspaper, I’m upset about it. And I’ve been upset about it.”

• Francona was not fired: “That is just factually incorrect,” Henry said of the firing talk (CBS Boston). “We didn’t fire him. He told us in the first meeting we had with him, he was not the voice to lead this team.”

• Henry said the starting pitching failed, but that Josh Beckett is one of the most competitive players he's ever met. He also said he's going to talk to the team about leadership in the clubhouse.

• On Epstein: "I would have loved for Theo to be our GM for the next 20 years. ... I did everything I could personally to make that happen."

• "I think the chaos that's going on is much more external than internal. The Red Sox aren't in ashes. That's not how we feel about it."

• Henry believes Epstein never saw himself as the long-term GM due to the demands of the job.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: September 29, 2011 3:35 am
Edited on: September 29, 2011 3:37 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Baseball's amazing night

Evan Longoria

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Plain and simple, if you're a baseball fan, Wednesday night was flat awesome. It reminded you just why we have the greatest game out there, and that each and every of the 162 games of the season could end up meaning something. Three of the four games that were part of the wild-card races were tight, two of them going into extra innings with ninth-inning heroics. Although this space will be filled from the four big games of the night, there were several other worthy performances that shouldn't be overlooked -- like Mike Napoli's two-run homer against his old team giving the Rangers home-field advantage in the ALDS, Stephen Strasburg striking out 10 in six innings to earn his first win of the season, Trevor Plouffe's RBI single with two outs in the ninth to help the Twins avoid 100 losses and Miguel Bautista's two-hit shutout for the Mets. But what made Wednesday exciting was the four games that decided the wild cards -- Red Sox-Orioles, Yankees-Rays, Cardinals-Astros and Braves-Phillies.

Evan Longoria, Rays: Only two players in the history of the game have hit walk-off homers in their team's last game of the regular season to send their team to the postseason -- Bobby Thompson and now Evan Longoria. And Longoria didn't just hit the game-winner, he also gave the team the idea that it could come back with a three-run homer to cap a six-run eighth and pull the Rays to within a run of the Yankees. He also had a big defensive play, but more on that later. 

Chris Carpenter, Cardinals: While the other three games for the wild cards were taut nip-tuck affairs, Carpenter made sure the Cardinals had no worries, throwing a two-hit shutout in a 8-0 victory over the Astros. Carpenter finishes the season with a rather pedestrian 11-9 record and 3.45 ERA, but over the last month of the season he was 3-0 with a 2.15 ERA in six starts, including two shutouts.

Bud Selig: Yeah, everyone loves to complain about everything Bud does, but you've got to give credit where credit's due -- this ending the season on a Wednesday worked. Not only will it give us early games of the playoffs on a weekend, it gave us Wednesday night's excitement, without any other distractions. There were no football games to compete against, instead all of the sports world's eyes were on baseball. And anyone watching was rewarded in an amazing night.


Carl Crawford, Red Sox: It may not be fair to place the entire blame of Boston's disastrous 2011 on Crawford's shoulders, but when you have a $142-million contract, your shoulders have to be broad. Crawford was 1 for 4 on the night, but he'll best be remembered for not being able to run down Robert Andino's sinking liner that scored Nolan Reimold from second with the winning run. Crawford charged the ball and slid, but came up just short as the Red Sox lost for the 20th time in September. Crawford finished his first season in Boston hitting .255/.289/.405 with 11 homers and 56 RBI. Marco Scutaro's baserunning gaffe in the eighth inning will also be remembered as part of the team's epic collapse, but right now, Crawford's Q rating in Boston is lower than Bill Buckner's.

Craig Kimbrel, Braves: Atlanta's rookie closer led all big-league relievers with 126 strikeouts, finished tied for the most saves in the National League with 46 and may win Rookie of the Year in the NL. But his 2011 will forever be remembered for Wednesday night when he blew his eight save of the season, giving up a leadoff single to Placido Polanco. After striking out Carlos Ruiz, he walked Ben Francisco and Jimmy Rollins to load the bases. Chase Utley followed with a sacrifice fly to tie the game at 3, before Kimbrel was lifted from his 79th game of the season. Four innings later, the Phillies finally scored and then ended the Braves' season. Of Kimbrel's eight blown saves, three came in September, including a pivotal game on Sept. 9 in St. Louis against the eventual wild-card winners.

Greg Golson, Yankees:  Before Lognoria's heroics in the bottom of the 12th, Golson led off the top of the inning with a single, and then went to third when the next batter, Eric Chavez, singled. It appeared the Yankees would be able to push the go-ahead run across the plate, but Jorge Posada hit a grounder to third, and Golson was caught too far off the bag and Longoria tagged him out for the first out of the inning. Not only did Golson make the out, he also didn't even get into a rundown to let Chavez advance to third. Chris Dickerson then struck out and Brett Gardner grounded out to end the Yankees threat and set up Longoria's heroics.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: September 29, 2011 12:18 am
Edited on: September 29, 2011 2:17 am
 

Playoff race: Epic finish sends Rays to playoffs

Evan Longoria

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Evan Longoria's solo homer off of the Yankees' Scott Proctor capped what was perhaps the most exciting final day of the regular season in baseball history, and solidified two epic collapses by the Red Sox and the Braves.

Longoria's homer gave Tampa Bay an 8-7 victory just minutes after the Orioles' Robert Andino's liner scored the winning run in Baltimore to seal a 4-3 come-from-behind victory over the Red Sox. Longoria was in the on-deck circle in St. Petersburg, Fla., when the Red Sox score was announced. Just three minutes later, Longoria hit his second homer of the game.

It was just another comeback for the Rays, who were behind in the wild card race by as many as nine games and then were down 7-0 in the eighth inning of Wednesday's game against the Yankees. Tampa Bay scored six in the eighth inning, including three on Longoria's first homer of the night. Dan Johnson hit a two-out, pinch-hit homer in the ninth to tie the game.

While the Rays were within a strike of losing, the Red Sox were within a strike of winning.

Jonathan Papelbon, who had never surrendered an earned run at Camden Yards until Tuesday, struck out the first two batters he faced in the ninth inning trying to protect a 3-2 lead. But Chris Davis doubled and then Nolan Reimold hit a ground-rule double to tie the game and then Andino hit a sinking liner to left that Carl Crawford -- the former Ray -- couldn't catch, scoring Reimold.

Three minutes later, Longoria ended Boston's season, and completed the Red Sox collapse.

The Rays will now head to Texas to face the Rangers in the first round of ALDS on Friday, while the Yankees will host the Tigers.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: September 25, 2011 12:16 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Montero leads Yankees

Jesus Montero

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Jesus Montero, Yankees: The Yankees rookie is certainly making his case to be not only on the team's playoff roster, but also to be the team's starting designated hitter come Friday. Montero went 3 for 4, knocking in four with his fourth homer of the season in Saturday's 9-1 victory over the Red Sox. Montero is hitting .346/.414/.635 in 15 games since being called up on Sept. 1.

Alex Torres, Rays: The rookie reliever was trust into action when left-hander Jeff Niemann was pulled after allowing two runs in the first inning of the Rays' game against the Blue Jays. Torres threw five shutout innings, allowing three hits, striking out five and walking one in Tampa Bay's crucial 6-2 victory over Toronto. The 23-year-old left-hander was making just his fourth big-league appearance and his first multi-inning outing, earning his first win. The Rays got Torres along with Sean Rodriguez (and Matt Sweeney) in the 2009 trade of Scott Kazmir to Anaheim. 

Kyle Lohse, Cardinals: Cardinals manager Tony La Russa said Lohse would be his starter in a one-game playoff for the wild card if it comes to that on Thursday. Lohse gave him every reason to stand by that decision in Saturday's 2-1 win against the Cubs. The right-hander didn't pick up the decision, but he did have a season-high eight strikeouts in seven innings. After giving up a run on three hits in the first inning, Lohse gave up just three more hits and didn't allow a runner in scoring position over his final six innings. Lohse (14-8) lowered his ERA to 3.39.


Carlos Marmol, Cubs: The very best closers give a fan a sense of confidence -- when Mariano Rivera takes the mound, Yankees fans know the game is wrapped up. When Brian Wilson comes in, Giants fans can raise their beer (or, well, wine glass, it is the Giants). But when Carlos Marmol comes in, Cubs fans either reach for Pepto Bismol or a case of Old Style to help them forget. Marmol not only blew his 10th save of the season on Saturday, but he did it in a typical frustrating style -- after giving up a hit, he walked three batters to bring in the tying run and then uncorked a wild pitch to let in the winning run. 

Carl Crawford, Red Sox: Already a goat, if the Red Sox complete their epic collapse, his drop of a Russell Martin line drive in the second inning of Saturday's 9-1 loss to the Yankees could be the defining play of the team's disappointing finish to the 2011 season. If Crawford makes the catch, Andruw Jones would have been doubled up easily at second to end the second inning, down just a run. Instead, New York scored six runs in the inning, two on Crawford's play and then three more on Derek Jeter's homer. Crawford, batting second, drove in the Red Sox's only run, but it came in the seventh when Boston was already down 9-0. It was too little too late.

Justin Verlander, Tigers: It's not often you can put Verlander here, and it was little more than a bad outing, but it's just so shocking to see Verlander on this side of the ledger. Verlander, who should unanimously win the Cy Young Award, failed in his bid to become the first 25-game winner in the majors since Bob Welch won 26 in 1990. Verlander gave up five runs on eight hits in seven innings and had his streak of 12 consecutive starts with a win snapped as Detroit fell 6-5 to Baltimore.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: September 23, 2011 12:10 pm
Edited on: September 23, 2011 1:19 pm
 

Yanks' Cashman faked interest in Crawford

Brian CashmanBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Not only did Brian Cashman get an iPad for pretending to want Carl Crawford, he also got the Red Sox to (in retrospect) overpay.

Speaking to ESPNNewYork.com, the Yankees general manager admitted he didn't really have any interest in the left fielder, instead, he just wanted his rivals to have to shell out more money. In the end, Crawford signed a seven-year, $142 million contract with the Red Sox.

"I actually had dinner with the agent to pretend that we were actually involved and drive the price up," Cashman told ESPNNewYork.com. "The outfield wasn't an area of need, but everybody kept writing Crawford, Crawford, Crawford, Crawford. And I was like, 'I feel like we've got Carl Crawford in Brett Gardner, except he costs more than $100 million less, with less experience."

For the $14 million that Crawford is making in 2011, he's hit .259/.295/.410 with 11 home runs, 55 RBI, 18 stolen bases and scored 63 runs. Gardner, two years younger than Crawford, made $530,000 this season and is arbitration-eligible after the season. He's hit .261/.347/.374 with seven home runs, 36 RBI, 46 stolen bases and 83 runs scored. He's also the better defensive player, so it's obvious Cashman made the right choice -- at least for this season.

Cashman said the team's pursuit of Cliff Lee, on the other hand, was very much real. Cashman also said he was ready to send catching prospect Jesus Montero to Seattle to get Lee at midseason.

"You take all the players traded when Lee went to Cleveland to Philly, Philly to Seattle, and Seattle to Texas, and Montero would've been by far the best player moved in any of those deals," Cashman told the website.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: September 19, 2011 10:00 am
Edited on: September 19, 2011 10:32 am
 

Pepper: Crawford apologizes to Red Sox fans



By Matt Snyder


With the Rays climbing to within two games of the Red Sox in the AL wild-card race, it's going to be a fun final two weeks for baseball fans. Some interesting perspective on the drama comes from current Red Sox and former Rays' left fielder Carl Crawford.

Crawford played nine seasons and 1,253 regular-season games for the Rays. He's easily the best player in the history of the young franchise at this point, but he walked this past offseason for a seven-year, $142 million deal and signed with the Red Sox. And he's now having the worst season of his career, from an individual standpoint.

In a diary entry for ESPN.com, Crawford notes that hears the boos from "haters" when the Red Sox visit Tampa Bay and that those fans need to realize he's going to be coming back for six more years. Two more entries of note:

"If Tampa makes a miracle comeback and takes the wild card from us, I will be devastated. I definitely wouldn't want to lose to those guys and watch them get into the playoffs while we go home. That would just be devastating to me."

And ...

"I want to end the diary saying something to the fans of Boston. I just want to say I'm sorry for the year I've had. You guys have been really supportive and I appreciate that. Hopefully when we get into these playoffs, I can be the real Carl Crawford that I know I am. We'll see."

I love seeing that kind of accountability from someone who could easily just blow everyone off and count his millions.

Ironman: Speaking of the Rays, Johnny Damon has now tied Pete Rose and Hall of Famers Brooks Robinson and Hank Aaron with an impressive streak. Damon has now played in at least 140 games in 16 different seasons, making it a four-way tie atop the all-time record book (TampaBay.com). Does anyone doubt Damon can do it again next year and set the record? I sure don't.

More from Damon: This is funny, and true. Damon points out that Red Sox fans have to root for the Yankees now. “They’re going to have to root for them if they want a chance at the postseason,” Damon said (BostonHerald.com). “They couldn’t root for me when I played in New York. Now they have to root for the whole team.” Man, how much are Yankees fans relishing this?

Happy Birthday: Hall of Famer Joe Morgan turns 68 Monday (Hardball Times). The two-time MVP is widely considered the best second baseman to ever play the game (and was also a broadcaster for years, but we'll leave that alone, being his birthday and all ... )

While we're here: Speaking of Joe, he just led the world's largest chicken dance. Check it out (via Big League Stew):



Sigh: Tigers manager Jim Leyland says he isn't an "on-base percentage guy." (MLB.com) Look, Leyland knows a lot more about baseball than I do, which is quite an obvious fact. But that doesn't mean he can't be wrong about certain things. I just don't understand what it is with the so-called "old-school mentality" that prevents people from grasping that OBP is the percentage of times batters don't make an out. I don't get how you can not be an OBP guy. You go to the plate with a bat. The main object is to not make an out. It's very, very simple. Leyland, thankfully, doesn't say he likes batting average, but instead slugging. Slugging percentage is much more important than average, but OBP is much more important. Think about it. Even if you're just churning out singles and walks over and over, you're still scoring runs. Slugging is very important, too, which is why OPS has gotten more and more run in recent years.

Humbled Ozzie: White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen recently made a trip to the Negro Baseball League Museum in Kansas City and came away with a renewed appreciation for everything he has. "It’s so different, and sometimes you shake your head at what these guys went through all this stuff for baseball to be better now than then," he said (Chicago Tribune).

Shoot him up: Phillies slugging first baseman Ryan Howard has bursitis in his left ankle, and he'll have a cortisone shot to help him deal with the issue the rest of the season. (MLB.com)

Johan 'felt good:' Mets ace Johan Santana threw a three-inning simulated game Sunday and he "felt good." (ESPN New York)

Johnson wants Wang back: Chien-Ming Wang has been a bit inconsistent in his return to the hill this season, but he's shown flashes of being solid -- like in his quality-start win Sunday. It will be tough to squeeze into the Nationals' rotation next season, especially if they land a free agent like C.J. Wilson, but current Nats manager Davey Johnson says he'd bring Wang back. "As far as I'm concerned, he's a keeper," Johnson said (MASN Sports).

Don't rush: Rockies starting pitcher Jorge De La Rosa underwent Tommy John surgery June 3, but he's looking to be back by opening day of next season. That wouldn't be unheard of, but it would be just 10 months after a procedure which typically has a 10-14 month recovery period. So it would certainly be a quick recovery. Jim Tracy, his manager, wants De La Rosa to be patient. “I told him (De La Rosa) about Dr. Jobe and the importance of following the program and don’t try to deviate,’’ said Tracy (DenverPost.com). “Don’t try to speed it up. If you do that and you follow the program and you don’t try to speed it up, you’ll feel like you have a bionic arm. Because it will completely heal and you’ll basically have a brand new elbow.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: August 8, 2011 12:49 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Reddick, Red Sox walk-off winners

Josh Reddick

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Josh Reddick, Red Sox: In his first four at-bats of Sunday's game against the Yankees, Reddick went hitless and left six men on base. But he came up big in the 10th inning, singling in the game-winning run, for the first walk-off hit of his career. With the win, Boston moved back into sole possession of first place in the American League East, a game ahead of the Yankees. Reddick got his shot because Carl Crawford had three hits in his first four at-bats of the game, so after David Ortiz doubled with one out in the 10th off of Phil Hughes, the Yankees elected to intentionally walk Crawford and take their chances against Reddick. Reddick swung at Hughes' first offering, lining it the other way and just inside the left-field line, easily scoring pinch-runner Darnell McDonald from second.

Jake Peavy, White Sox: Peavy picked up his first victory since June 25 -- and his first win in a start since June 22 -- with eight shutout innings against the Twins. Peavy scattered three hits and struck out six batters without a walk to improve to 5-5 on the season. The White Sox picked up their first sweep of the Twins in Minnesota in more than seven years.

Johnny Giavotella, Royals: In just his third game in the big leagues, Ned Yost put the rookie second baseman in the No. 3 spot in the lineup. The result? A double and a solo homer. In three games this season, he's 5 for 11 and slugging .909. Giavotella started a rally in the fourth inning, leading the inning off with a double, moving to third on a wild pitch and scoring on Billy Butler's groundout. The Royals scored two more runs in the inning and his homer off of starter Max Scherzer in the next inning gave Kansas City a 4-0 victory, a lead they'd hold on to for a 4-3 victory over the Tigers.


Kevin Correia, Pirates: Correia wasn't awful -- but he needed to be better than that to put the stops to the Pirates' losing streak. He lasted 5 2/3 innings, allowing five hits and four runs on four walks and three strikeouts. Correia has 10 wins away from PNC Park, but is 2-7 with a 7.71 ERA at home, as the Pirates lost 7-3 to the Padres to drop their 10th in a row. With the loss and Milwaukee's win, the Pirates fell to 10 games out of first place in the National League Central and into fourth place, a half-game behind the Reds. Pittsburgh is now five games under .500 on the season at 54-59.

Rockies resting on the sabbath: Colorado lost its 16th consecutive Sunday game, falling 3-2 to the Nationals at Coors Field. The Rockies won their first two Sunday games of the season and haven't won since. Colorado came back to tie the game in the seventh, but Jayson Werth's RBI single in the eighth gave the Nationals the lead and ultimately the victory.

Marlins defense: Logan Morrison and shortstop Emilio Bonifacio ran into each other trying to catch Corey Patterson's sixth-inning popup, allowing Patterson to reach second. After getting two outs, the Marlins intentionally walked Albert Pujols and Matt Holliday singled to right, where Mike Stanton let the ball bounce off his glove. Patterson would have scored anyway, but it allowed Pujols to go to third and Holliday to advance to third (not to mention tie the game). After an intentional walk to Lance Berkman, Jon Jay singled in two runs on a blooper. After Florida tied the game in the bottom of the inning, Bonifacio's throwing error on a Patterson grounder led to three unearned runs in the seventh and a 8-4 Cardinals victory.

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Posted on: July 17, 2011 9:52 pm
Edited on: July 18, 2011 5:52 am
 

Ortiz, Gregg to have suspensions shortened

Kevin GreggBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Red Sox designated hitter David Ortiz and Orioles pitcher Kevin Gregg will have their suspensions reduced to three games and start serving them Monday, MLB.com's Brittany Ghiroli writes.

Ghiroli writes the move isn't official, "but likely." It would mean the two wouldn't play in the three-game series starting Monday night in Baltimore.

The two were each suspended four games and have appealed and continued to play.

The Red Sox, though, are expected to have Carl Crawford in the lineup after he played two rehab games on Friday and Saturday for Triple-A Pawtuckett.

Boston will also get left-hander Jon Lester back from the disabled list on July 26 against Kansas City. Lester has been on the DL since July 6 with a left latissimus strain.


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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com