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Tag:Hall of Fame
Posted on: February 23, 2012 9:52 am
 

Carter honored, service to be streamed live

By Matt Snyder

It's been nearly a week since Hall of Famer Gary Carter died at just 57 years old, but he hasn't left the consciousness from his many fans and admirers.

Gary Carter's death
Earlier this week, Montreal city council unanimously approved a motion that called for the city to find something to name after Carter. As things currently stand, it will be "a street or place to name in his honour." (MontrealGazette.com)

“Gary Carter was so associated with the Montreal Expos; his death was like the Expos were leaving for a second time,” Projet Montréal leader Richard Bergeron said (MontrealGazette.com).

The council majority leader, Marvin Rotrand, told MontrealGazette.com that finding the proper place to name after Carter will be done in consultation with the Carter family.

There will be a memorial service for family and friends of "The Kid" Friday at 7 p.m. in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. For those interested, it will be streamed live by Christ Fellowship Church on their website.

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Posted on: February 16, 2012 5:06 pm
Edited on: February 16, 2012 6:38 pm
 

Hall of Famer Gary Carter, 57, dies



By C. Trent Rosecrans


Hall of Fame catcher Gary Carter died on Thursday, his daughter wrote on Thursday. Carter was diagnosed with glioblastoma, an aggressive brain cancer, last May.

On a website to update Carter's health, his daughter, Kimmy Carter Bloemers, wrote:
It has been exactly 4 weeks since the last journal and that decision was made as a family. I am deeply saddened to tell you all that my precious dad went to be with Jesus today at 4:10 pm. This is the most difficult thing I have ever had to write in my entire life but I wanted you all to know.

He is in heaven and has reunited with his mom and dad. I believe with all my heart that dad had a STANDING OVATION as he walked through the gates of heaven to be with Jesus.

Thank you all for loving my dad and my entire family. I will still share with you all the last four weeks with my dad because they were incredibly special.

I am thankful that many years ago, my dad accepted Jesus Christ to be his personal Savior because I know He is now in NO pain and is the most beautiful angel. He is now in God's Hall of Fame.

We praise you, Jesus and thank you for giving my dad to us for 57 years.
Carter, 57, was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003. An 11-time All-Star and three-time Gold Glove winner, Carter played parts of 19 seasons with the Expos, Mets, Giants and Dodgers. He was the first player to be enshrined in Cooperstown wearing an Expos cap on his plaque.

A career .262/.335/.439 hitter, Carter hit 324 homers in his career and led the National League with 106 RBI in 1984, his last in Montreal. In his second year with the Mets, he helped lead the team to its second World Series title. Carter finished third in National League MVP voting in 1986 and his two-out 10th-inning single in Game 6 of the 1986 World Series helped start the Mets' come-from-behind victory.

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Posted on: February 15, 2012 1:57 pm
 

Report: Gwynn's surgery a success

By Matt Snyder

Hall of Famer and baseball legend Tony Gwynn underwent surgery to remove a cancerous tumor in his right cheek Tuesday night, and it was successful, reports ESPN.com.

The source ESPN.com used for the story is Gwynn's wife, Alicia, who told the outlet that the surgery didn't end until 1 a.m. PT, meaning the Hall of Famer was under the knife for 14 hours. But the good news is that just 7 1/2 hours later, Gwynn was reportedly in great spirits and drinking water.

"All is well -- it doesn't seem like last time,'' Alicia Gwynn said (ESPN.com). "It turned out great. He looks good, he looks normal. His eyelids are a little swollen, but they got all the cancer. They say they got it all. His face looks good. They did an amazing job.''

Also, it sounds like the doctors got all of the cancer:

"He's a little drowsy now, and we'll be talking to the doctors again, but, yes, the biopsies were clear," she said (ESPN.com). "The doctors and staff were amazing. They had nurses contacting me every hour while he was in surgery. And now Tony's talking already.''

Gwynn, 51, is the current head baseball coach at San Diego State. He used smokeless tobacco inside his right cheek for a period of at least 30 years and has admitted he was addicted. He hasn't used since his 2010 surgery.

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Posted on: February 14, 2012 3:29 pm
Edited on: February 14, 2012 4:07 pm
 

Report: Gwynn having surgery to remove tumor

Tony GwynnBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Hall of Fame outfielder Tony Gwynn was scheduled to have surgery on a cancerous tumor in his right cheek, the same place he had a growth removed 18 months ago, ESPN.com reports.

Gwynn's wife, Alicia, told Friend the doctors didn't believe the cancer had spread beyond Gwynn's salivary glad, but they expect to know more after the surgery. Alicia Gwynn said doctors may also perform a nerve graft to preserve his facial functions.

Gwynn, the baseball coach at San Diego State, was diagnosed with cancer in his mouth in August of 2010. He's blamed the cancer on his smokeless tobacco habit. Gwynn used smokeless tobacco for his entire 20-year big-league career and beyond. However, he said he has not used since his 2010 surgery.

In his previous surgery, the doctors left part of a nerve to help control his facial functions, so part of the tumor was left in and the surgery was supplemented with chemotherapy. If the tumor is still on the nerve this time, Alicia Gwynn said her husband instructed doctors to just take it out and then go ahead with the nerve graft to help preserve his facial functions.

"Tony told them to take [the malignant tumor] all out," Alicia Gwynn told ESPN.com. "They said they may need to remove the facial nerve -- they might have to go a lot deeper. But he just told them to take it out. And if they do remove the facial nerve, they'll replace it with a nerve from his shoulder or leg.

"Hopefully, his face will work fine; hopefully he'll be able to blink his eye. They said they will make his face as normal as they can -- and that it might be better than it was."

The best case scenario, Alicia Gwynn said, would have Gwynn back on the field at San Diego State in about a month.

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Posted on: January 28, 2012 4:07 pm
 

Hall of Famer Robinson falls, breaks clavicle

By Matt Snyder

Orioles Hall of Fame third baseman Brooks Robinson was injured in a fall Friday night, reports Joe Capozzi of Fish Tank blog. Robinson fell backward off a stage at a pre-game dinner for the Joe DiMaggio Legends Game in Florida -- which is being played Saturday -- after he leaned back in his chair expecting to hit a wall. Instead, there was no wall and Robinson fell a reported six to eight feet before hitting the ground, suffering two fractures -- including one to his clavicle (commonly known as the collar bone).

Robinson was supposed to play in the game but now is obviously unable to do so.

“I understand he is doing fine but I really don’t know any more details other than that happened and he won’t be with us today,’’ Kevin Janser, the executive vice president for the Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital Foundation, said (Fish Tank).

Let us send our best wishes to the 74-year-old Robinson in his recovery.

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Posted on: January 19, 2012 4:17 pm
 

Gary Carter's health worsens

By Matt Snyder

Unfortunately, the news keeps getting worse when it comes to the cancerous tumors in Hall of Famer Gary Carter's brain. The most recent news is "extremely grave," per the New York Daily News. Carter fell violently enough on Christmas Day to tear his rotator cuff and the most recent MRI has revealed even more spots and tumors, according to Carter's daughter (on their family website).

What's worse, Carter doesn't sound like he's optimistic at all.

"I'm not feeling too good," he told New York Daily News a few weeks ago. "It's been coming on and coming on. I've had a chest cold. I've got sores in my mouth, blood clots. I get sick ... there's just so many things ... It's been nine months now and I don't feel any different from Day One. I haven't been up to doing any interviews."

Finally, the worst news of all is that the Daily News is reporting that doctors are considering no further treatment.

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Posted on: January 9, 2012 3:19 pm
Edited on: January 9, 2012 4:34 pm
 

2012 Baseball Hall of Fame voting breakdown



By Matt Snyder


Barry Larkin was voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame with 86.4 percent of the vote. The results of the BBWAA votes were revealed Monday afternoon, and Larkin was the only player garnering the required 75 percent of the vote for enshrinement.

There were 573 total ballots, but nine were left blank. Players may remain on the ballot for 15 years, unless they fall below the five percent barrier in voting. Those who get less than five percent of the vote will be removed from the ballot prior to next year's vote.

Here's a total breakdown of how the voting went for the other 26 candidates. First, these guys will remain on the ballot moving forward:

Jack Morris - 382 votes (66.7 percent)
Jeff Bagwell - 321 (56)
Lee Smith - 290 (50.6)
Tim Raines - 279 (48.7)
Edgar Martinez - 209 (36.5)
Alan Trammell - 211 (36.8)
Fred McGriff - 137 (23.9)
Larry Walker - 131 (22.9)
Mark McGwire - 112 (19.5)
Don Mattingly - 102 (17.8)
Dale Murphy - 83 (14.5)
Rafael Palmeiro - 72 (12.6)
Bernie Williams - 55 (9.6)

Hall of Fame ballot
Now, the following players will be removed from the ballot, as they didn't get five percent of the vote:

Juan Gonzalez - 23 votes (four percent)
Vinny Castilla - 6 (1)
Tim Salmon - 5 (0.9)
Bill Mueller - 4 (0.5)
Brad Radke - 2 (0.3)
Javy Lopez - 1 (0.2)
Eric Young - 1 (0.2)
Jeromy Burnitz - 0
Brian Jordan - 0
Terry Mulholland - 0
Phil Nevin - 0
Ruben Sierra - 0
Tony Womack - 0

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Posted on: January 9, 2012 3:03 pm
Edited on: January 9, 2012 3:23 pm
 

Years 2014-16 will crowd Hall of Fame ballot



By Matt Snyder


With the 2012 Hall of Fame class set to be Barry Larkin and Ron Santo, we can now look ahead to future years -- while kicking and screaming about who should have gotten in or who didn't deserve it, of course; heaven forbid anyone just celebrate the careers of Larkin and Santo and move on. My colleague C. Trent Rosecrans has taken a look at the explosive 2013 Hall of Fame class of first-year eligibles. Just envision all the arguing and name-calling that will take place in our comments section next year at this time (remember, everyone's personal opinion is right and everyone else is an idiot with absolutely no room for discussion!). I have a headache already.

Anyway, the ballot doesn't let up anytime soon, either. Check out the first-year eligible classes for the ensuing three ballots. And remember, these guys are only joining those remaining on the ballot. It's going to get overly crowded with legitimate superstars unless a few classes have upwards of four or five inductees.

Here are the most notable guys joining the ballot before 2017, divided up by year.

2014

Greg Maddux - Listing his numbers is a waste of time. He's as much of a lock as anyone.

Frank Thomas - It's also hard to see the Big Hurt not getting in on the first try as well. He has more than 500 home runs, two MVPs, and a ridiculous .974 career OPS (156 OPS-plus).

Hall of Fame coverage
Tom Glavine - Are 300 wins good for automatic induction? I think so. The two Cy Youngs and six top three finishes in Cy voting also help to make him a lock.

Jeff Kent - While not a very good defender, Kent was one of the best offensive second basemen in history. His 377 home runs are the most ever for a 2B while his .290/.356/.500 line is stellar from that position. Kent's WAR is very similar to Ryne Sandberg's, and Ryno got in on his third try. It might be tougher for Kent, with the crowded ballots and all. Think about it, are the voters really going to put in four first-year guys here? Very doubtful, especially considering there will be worthy guys lingering from previous ballots.

Mike Mussina - Moose went 270-153 in his career with an assortment of Gold Gloves, All-Star appearances and top six finishes in Cy Young voting. His 3.68 career ERA came in a time when it was a hitters' game, as it factors out to a 123 ERA-plus. Will his shortfall in wins (30 shy of 300) and strikeouts (187 short of 3,000) cost him? It very well might.

Luis Gonzalez - He was just a pretty good player until getting to Arizona, so he probably didn't do it long enough.

Moises Alou - He actually has better rate stats than Gonzalez, but the feeling is neither makes it.

2015

Randy Johnson - The only question is Mariners or Diamondbacks cap on his bust. I'll lean toward D-Backs with the four Cy Youngs and World Series ring, but he pitched 1 1/2 more seasons in Seattle. But this is a discussion for a different day.

Pedro Martinez - He was the most dominant pitcher in baseball for a seven-year stretch. He won three Cy Young awards and had the best MLB ERA in five of those aforementioned seven seasons. In all, Pedro was 219-100 with a 2.93 ERA, 1.05 WHIP and over 3,000 strikeouts in a big-time hitters' era. He has to be in, probably on the first ballot.

John Smoltz - How heavily will the 213 wins and 154 saves weigh on the minds of voters? I'm guessing a good amount. He also has that Cy Young and over 3,000 strikeouts. Even if not on the first ballot, Smoltz will be enshrined.

Gary Sheffield - One of the more feared hitters of his generation, Sheffield's offensive numbers say he's worthy (509 homers, .907 career OPS, over 1,600 runs and RBI). But he was in the Mitchell Report, so -- judging from what we've seen so far from the voters in terms of the steroid-connected guys -- he's probably not going to get in.

Nomar Garciaparra - Through 2003, he was headed to Cooperstown, but things derailed after that. His career triple slash line (.313/.361/.521) is pretty damn good, but was he dominant long enough? I'll guess no.

Carlos Delgado - With tons of power in his prime, Delgado ended up with 473 homers and 1,512 RBI. His .383 on-base percentage and .929 OPS (138 OPS-plus) are very impressive, too. My guess, though, is Delgado put up those numbers in the wrong era and he falls short.

2016

Ken Griffey Jr. - Easy choice.

Trevor Hoffman - The Hall voters haven't been kind to closers, but Hoffman saved 601 games, obliterating the previous record (held by Lee Smith) until Mariano Rivera passed him last season. I bet Hoffman gets in with relative ease. If not the first try, certainly the second or third.

Billy Wagner - See the above comment about Hall voters' treatment of closers. Wagner was definitely dominant, but I feel like only Rivera and Hoffman get in from this generation of closers.

Andy Pettitte - If you only look at the regular season stats, Pettitte has a case as a very good pitcher who wasn't a Hall of Famer. He went 240-138 with a 3.88 ERA, 1.36 WHIP and 2,251 strikeouts. He garnered Cy Young votes in five different seasons but never won the award. However, will 75 percent of the voters consider the postseason and cast a vote for Pettitte? It's possible. He was 19-10 with a 3.83 ERA in the postseason, in a whopping 263 innings. He has five rings and went to the World Series three other times (once with the Astros, remember). He will not be getting into the Hall on his first handful of tries, but maybe after a decade or so on the ballot Pettitte makes it. Then again, he also was named in the Mitchell Report.

Jim Edmonds - The four-time All-Star won eight Gold Gloves and hit 393 homers. He hit .284/.376/.527 and racked up 67.9 WAR according to Baseball-Reference.com. Still, with less than 2,000 hits, less than 400 home runs and less than 1,300 runs or RBI, I'd bet he doesn't have a real shot of making it.



So there you have it. Without considering the guys who were already on the ballot from previous years and then factoring in the huge class of 2013, we have three years with what I think will yield nine Hall of Famers. Maybe 10 if Pettitte gets enough support. Now, keep in mind I'm not a voter nor was I saying above who I would personally want to see in the Hall. I'm merely trying to guess how the voting body will react to the players above, based upon how they've treated players in the recent past.

Simply put, the ballot is going to be very, very crowded in a few years.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com