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Tag:George Steinbrenner
Posted on: March 4, 2011 9:53 am
Edited on: April 18, 2011 12:29 pm
 

Pepper: Big Puma struggling through spring

Lance Berkman

By C. Trent Rosecrans

The Cardinals came out of the offseason sacrificing defense for offense, but that offense may have a hard time even getting on the field.

Lance Berkman, inked in as the team's right fielder going into the spring, was scratched from the team's lineup on Thursday because of a sore left calf. Berkman had already been limited to designated hitter work because of a bad left elbow.

It's just the first week of games, and Berkman has been limited to play in the field. On Thursday, Berkman told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch he was "perfectly fine" and would still go to Kissimmee, Fla., on Friday to face his old team, the Astros.

Friday morning, Berkman wasn't on the bus, missing another game.

Prospect Zack Cox filled in for Berkman at DH on Thursday and knocked in a run, but he's not ready to fill in full-time for Berkman in the field and the National League doesn't have the DH.

Sure, it's early, and several players are battling bumps and bruises, but not all of them are 35, coming off a down season, moving to a more demanding physical position, blocked at their old position and being counted on to remedy a team's offense. That's a lot on the shoulders of the Big Puma, and it's looking less like he can shoulder that load.

WAKE-UP: As if stepping into the box against a guy who can sling the ball 105 mph wasn't enough to get your attention, the first pitch ending up somewhere near the bull certainly got Dodger Trent Oeltjen's attention. Thursday night, the first pitch of Chapman's inning of work went over the catcher's mitt and over the umpire's head. His next three pitches to Oeltjen were strikes, including strike three looking.

"If it was at my face, I wouldn't have had time to move," Oeltjen told the Los Angeles Times' Dylan Hernandez. "It woke me up. He sent a message he was throwing hard."

Said new manager Don Mattingly: "Jeez, huh? He was Randy Johnson-ish. It gets there quick, doesn't it?"

GOOD NEWS, BAD NEWS: Carlos Zambrano didn't fight anyone in his Thursday start for the Cubs -- not only that, he threw three scoreless innings. However, he did complain of arm fatigue after the start.

"I was just tired," Zambrano said to the Chicago Sun-Times. "It's normal. I wasn't feeling power in my arm, but I guarantee you I will work hard and feel good in my next start."

Zambrano note he typically feels a "dead-arm" at least once a spring.

JUST BAD NEWS: Yesterday the question was if Astros' catcher Jason Castro would miss the beginning of the season. Today, it's if he'll play at all this season.

Thursday night, Castro was diagnosed with a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee. Castro was scheduled to have surgery this morning, and general manager Ed Wade said he could return "by mid-September." (Houston Chronicle)

WAIT FOR JUDGEMENT? Matt Cain said he hasn't thrown a ball since coming down with elbow inflammation on Sunday and will likely miss multiple starts this spring. 

However, Cain's not too concerned, even after taking an MRI.

There is a history -- and this is something to watch -- of pitchers going to the postseason one season and having trouble the next because of the increased workload. While Cain's not worried, it'll be something to monitor with all of the Giants' pitching staff. (San Francisco Chronicle)

ANOTHER WART: Hopefully Orioles starter Brian Matusz won't tweet a picture like Michael Cuddyer, but he'll also be having a wart professionally removed.

Matusz's wart is on the middle finger of his pitching hand. Still, he threw two scoreless innings on Wednesday even with the wart. He had it some last year, but pitched through it. He said it bothers him some on his breaking ball. (Baltimore Sun)

WAS THAT REALLY A CONSIDERATION? Oliver Perez has been the New York media's favorite target for a while, but is this really necessary? The New Your Daily News' "breaking news" from "a source" is that the Mets have internally decided Perez will not be a starter during the regular season.

The Daily News' Andy Martino wrote that the day after he wrote the team would cut Perez (and his $12 million salary) if he didn't perform well in his start on Thursday. Well, he threw two scoreless innings against the Cardinals, so Martino didn't get his wish. Instead, he had to find a new way to pile onto Perez.

Hey, it's not to say Perez doesn't stink. He does. Or that he's not overpaid -- he is. It's just, this breathless reporting seems almost like piling on. Sure, the Mets have said he's in contention for the rotation, but the Mets say a lot of things, and it's not like we believe those.

NOW HE COULD BE IN A ROTATION: Neftali Feliz wasn't too happy with his first start of spring. Still, he threw two scoreless innings, so it wasn't bad. He also threw three different pitches, but struggled with his command and rhythm.

The Feliz story may be one of the more interesting ones of spring, and certainly something to watch as the month goes along. He'll throw three innings next week. (Fort Worth Star-Telegram)

VISA TIME: Edinson Volquez, Cincinnati's opening-day starter, could pitch his first spring training start because of a visa problem, but he should be able to make his next start after a quick trip to his native Dominican Republic.

"Everything is set," he told the Cincinnati Enquirer's John Fay. "They're just waiting for me to pitch it up."

He was unable to pitch in games at which admission is charged because he came to camp on a travel visa, not a work visa. His work visa was held up because of his failed drug test and suspension last season.

COCO CONTRITE: A's outfielder Coco Crisp said he's embarrassed about his DUI arrest on Wednesday morning. (San Francisco Chronicle)

GO METS OR GO HOME: Former Cardinals and A's closer Jason Isringhausen is back in camp for the Mets, after starting a comeback last season in the Reds system.

Isringhausen played in Triple-A last season, but says his bus-riding days are over. If he doesn't break camp with the Mets, he'll just go home and call it a career. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

OR JUST GO HOME: Boston's J.D. Drew says he's considering retiring after this year. It's been one of those things he's hinted at before and is hardly a surprise. (Boston Herald)

SO WHO IS A-ROD? According to Wikileaks, a U.S. diplomatic cable on the 2009 Iranian election called President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad the "George Steinbrenner of Iran" when talking about his influence over the national soccer team.

I'm guessing that wasn't a compliment. (Associated Press)

WHAT'S A WORLD SERIES WORTH? How much are World Series starts worth to a Hall of Fame discussion? Or, even more words about Jack Morris from Baseball Prospectus.

Honestly, I used to be a Morris for the Hall guy, I'm not anymore. I used to not be a Bert Blyleven guy, but I am now. But I'll certainly never change my feeling that I never want to hear another Morris-Blyleven debate.

A BETTER SCORECARD: An interview with Bethany Heck, the designer of a new, better, scorebook. Heck's 20-game scorebook is like "if Moleskine made a scorebook…" (Bugs & Cranks)

WHAT TO WATCH: Jake Peavy will make his first start since July 6 today against the Angels in Tempe, Ariz.

"Hopefully, we'll see some of the hard work we've done pay off," he told the Chicago Tribune.

QUARTERBACK SHOWDOWN: There's a Groundhog Day aspect to spring training, so Padres manager Bud Black found a way to break up the monotony -- a quarterback combine.

While Cam Newton and Blaine Gabbert (seriously, could you draft a quarterback named "Blaine") did this in Indianapolis last week, Black had his former quarterbacks -- top prospect Casey Kelly, Cory Luebke, Orlando Hudson and Nick Hundley -- go through their own competition Thursday morning.

According to MLB.com's Corey Brock, the three went through several drills, including hitting a moving target. Luebke, a high school quarterback in Ohio, upset Kelly, who signed a letter of intent to play QB at Tennessee.

"We're here for six weeks," Black said. "… We try to do some things to keep the guys going."

MARK YOUR CALENDAR: The Reds have announced the front-runner for the year's best bobblehead. On July 2 against the Indians, fans will receive the combination Dusty Baker bobblehead and toothpick holder. The bobblehead even has Dusty with a toothpick in his mouth (and, of course, sweatbands on his arms). So far, it's the best bobblehead I've seen on tap for this year, with the Reds also getting second place for their Jonny Gomes bobblehead and arm, mimicking the way Gomes tugs at his helmet before every at-bat.

Dusty Baker

IF YOU'RE NOT ALREADY BEARDED OUT: The literary journal McSweeney's is selling a "How to Beard Yourself Like Brian Wilson" poster.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
More MLB coverage
Posted on: December 16, 2010 2:19 pm
Edited on: December 17, 2010 3:49 pm
 

Top 10 baseball storylines from 2010

Honorable Mention CBSSports.com will be revealing its Top 10 Stories of the 2010 season next week, but here at MLB Facts and Rumors we're going to reveal our own Top 10 list, sans the storylines that will be appearing on the overall list.

Here's the top storylines from the 2010 season that didn't make the cut:

  10. Felix Hernandez wins AL Cy Young
The Mariners ace ran away with the Cy Young Award after posting a 2.27 ERA (3.26 xFIP), whiffing 232 in 249 2/3 innings and walking just 70 batters and posting a 13-12 record.

Wait, what?

Yup -- a starting pitcher won the Cy Young with a 13-12 record. Now, there have been past winners who had shoddy records, but in light of Zack Greinke's victory in 2009 with "just" a 16-8 record, it's clear that wins are being marginalized -- and that's a good thing.

Hernandez The majority of GMs and front-office executives understand the fallacy of judging a pitcher's performance on wins. After all, for a pitcher to get a win, the offense and defense play important parts -- and one could argue the offense plays a more important role. Hernandez was clearly the best pitcher in the league (although CC Sabathia did get short shrift) and deserves the award, but could you have seen this coming just five years ago?

Nope. We're in the middle of a seismic shift where advanced statistics are starting to take hold in mainstream media -- for the better. While the statistics used in the sabermetric community (such as xFIP, which is quoted often in this blog) will always be ahead of mainstream media, the mere fact one can find national writers quoting ERA+ is a positive.

  9. End of an era for legendary managers
Four managers with impressive pedigrees saw their managerial careers come to an end (well -- for now).

In Toronto, Cito Gaston ended his return to the managerial ranks by guiding the team to a 85-77 record. Of course, Gaston will be remembered more for his original stint as a Blue Jay where he won back-to-back World Series titles.

Cox Lou Piniella was another to exit stage left, stepping down near the end of yet another disappointing season as Cubs skipper. Piniella takes with him a 116-win season (2001 Mariners) and World Series ring (1990 Reds) along with 1,835 victories.

Joe Torre joins Piniella as another ex-Yankees manager who retired. After Torre bounced around from the Mets to Braves to Cardinals, he landed with the Yankees with almost 15 years experience and then turned into a star. He won four titles in five seasons and remained in New York for 12 years. He just finished up a three-year stint with the Dodgers that saw him win an additional two division titles and retire with 2,326 victories.

Last, but definitely not least, is Bobby Cox (pictured). Cox managed the Braves for 25 years from 1978-81 and then again from 1990-2010. In between, he managed the Blue Jays and served as Atlanta's general manager. Cox had just three losing seasons as Braves manager, going 40-57 in 1990, 79-83 in 2006 and 72-90 in 2008. He oversaw the vaunted trio of Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine and John Smoltz and won 100-plus games five times, capturing his World Series ring in 1995. All told, he won 2,504 games and lost 2,001.

  8. Chase for Triple Crown
At one point during the season, a Triple Crown was a distinct possibility in both the AL and NL. Josh Hamilton and Miguel Cabrera had a showdown in the AL, but Hamilton's missing most of September cut short any possibility of winning the Triple Crown. Hamilton beat Cabrera in batting average, .359 to .328, but Miggy bested Hamilton with 38 homers to the Ranger's 32. (Jose Bautista pulled away from the field with 54 home runs, but this was a lot closer in July and August than it ended up being.) Cabrera overcame Bautista to win the RBI title with 126 ribbies, and Hamilton was 12th with 100 RBI on the nose.

Pujols The NL was a lot more closer with the combatants as Joey Votto and Albert Pujols (pictured). Pujols ended up with 118 RBI, Votto 113 -- but the reigning NL MVP beat Pujols in batting average with a .324 mark as compared to Phat Albert's .312. (Carlos Gonzalez won the title with a .336 mark.) Ah, but Pujols walked away the home-run king with 42 bombs, Votto cranking 37.

  7. Rookies of the Year
In the AL, two rookies grabbed everyone's attention with center fielder Austin Jackson flourishing in Detroit and Neftali Feliz notching 40 saves. A slow start derailed Brian Matusz's hype in Baltimore, but by the end of the year it was looking like he could be the ace many had predicted him to be.

The real story was in the NL, where there was a plethora of candidates in Buster Posey, Ike Davis, Mike Leake, Stephen Strasburg, Jason Heyward, Madison Bumgarner, Ian Desmond, David Freese, Mike Stanton, Travis Wood, Pedro Alvarez, Aroldis Chapman, Starlin Castro, Logan Morrison, Gaby Sanchez, Jose Tabata, Jon Niese...

Yep, there was a bona fide youth movement in the NL this year, and it should be one fun league to watch over the next few seasons. In any other given year, at least five, if not more, could have won Rookie of the Year awards. But they didn't.

Posey So, who actually got the Rookie of the Year Awards?

The AL honor went to Feliz for his 40 saves in 69 1/3 innings, punching out 71 and walking 18. He has the potential to be a stud closer for years... or could be moved back to the rotation. Your move, Texas.

In the NL, Buster Posey (pictured) whisked the award away from Jason Heyward with a .305/.357/.505 line in 443 plate appearances, bashing 18 home runs and leading the Giants to the World Series. Nah, he didn't set any expectations for himself.

  6. Dodger Divorce
This storyline isn't quite over, but 2010 saw the sordid trial and subsequent decision by the judge that both Frank and Jamie McCourt own the Dodgers. Whether or not this pushes the team to sell isn't known yet, but this was a divorce that captured the hearts of tabloids and overshadowed the constant Hollywood marital troubles that plague movie celebrities.

At the crux of the issue were two separate agreements that detailed either Frank (pictured below left) possessing sole ownership of the club, or both. Frank's lawyer admitted he made changed to the marital agreement without notifying Jamie or her representatives that gave Frank sole ownership.

With the agreement nullified, Frank is pursuing other avenues to be declared the sole owner while Jamie and representatives say that the Dodgers must be treated like community property. While there's still more battles to be had, the war is over: both McCourts own the team and it's difficult to fathom both co-existing, which will lead to the team's sale.

 
McCourt 5. Year of the Pitcher
Six no-hitters were thrown in 2010, a remarkable achievement. Only two other times were six no-hitters thrown, and that's not including the Perfect Game That Wasn't in Armando Galarraga's perfecto.

Ubaldo Jimenez tossed the first no-hitter in Rockies franchise history against the Braves on April 17 to get the no-nos started. Matt Garza also tossed a franchise-first no-hitter, doing so for the Rays vs. the Tigers on July 26, the final no-hitter of the regular season.

Dallas Braden then followed that up with a perfect game against the Rays on May 9th, adding a nice little wrinkle to the earlier flap with Alex Rodriguez, when he yelled at the third baseman to "get off my mound." Rodriguez responded in Pedro Martinez form , asking just who the heck Braden was. Cue perfect game. Now people know who Braden is.

New Phillie Roy Halladay (pictured) followed in Braden's footsteps 20 days later, pitching perfect against the Marlins May 29.

Edwin Jackson joined in on the fun June 25th, throwing an incredible 149 pitches to notch a no-no for the Diamondbacks.

Lastly, Halladay did perhaps the most impressive feat of all, blanking the Reds in Game 1 of the NL Division Series on October 6. It's the second no-hitter to be thrown in the postseason, behind Don Larsen's perfecto in 1956. He was one walk in the 5th away from a second perfect game.

Halladay That wasn't all that made the year all about pitchers, however. Fifteen hurlers tied the all-time record for most pitchers with at least 200 strikeouts, paced by Jered Weaver's 233 whiffs.

  4. George Steinbrenner passes
Steinbrenner was someone who loomed over baseball from Day One upon his acquisition of the Yankees in 1973. Brash and loud, Steinbrenner wouldn't accept any form of losing and while New York won two World Series in 1976-77 and appeared in two others in 1976 and 1981, New York quickly fell into obscurity as Steinbrenner's demands weren't the way a club should be run.

His overturn of management personnel was rough as well, as 20 managers served under his watch over his first 23 seasons, Billy Martin the poster boy for this overturn. Steinbrenner was also suspended for 15 months after the 1974 season for illegal campaign contributions to Richard Nixon. It wouldn't be his last suspension.

Despite this, however, the Yankees reinvigorated a brand that had been dormant for a decade. Then, the best thing that could have happened to New York did with King George's second suspension, handed out for paying a gambler for trying to dig up information on star Dave Winfield, whom Steinbrenner had made the highest-paid player in baseball history at the time before clashing with the Hall of Famer.

This allowed Gene Michael, the GM, to take over day-to-day Yankees business and upon Steinbrenner's reinstatement in 1993, he was more willing to be hands off -- as hands off as he could be, anyways.

This shift led the Yankees to their glory years behind Derek Jeter, Jorge Posada, Bernie Williams, Andy Pettitte, and so on. The Yankees captured four World Series in a five-year span, three straight from 1998-2000. They would continue to be the face of baseball throughout the beginning of the 21st century and captured another World Series in 2009, the last postseason Steinbrenner would see.

Steinbrenner The Boss passed on the morning of the 2010 All-Star Game, July 13. With that, the Yankees lost perhaps their most influential and important owner in franchise history (although one could make a case for Jacob Ruppert ).

  3. Cliff Lee Watch
On MLB Facts and Rumors, Cliff Lee has been written more than any other player -- and team. The Cliff Lee tag beats out the Diamondbacks, Pirates, Orioles, Rockies, Padres, Blue Jays, Tigers, Brewers, Royals, Angels, Athletics, Astros and Indians. That's a lot.

That's not all, however. There's also a Cliff Lee Watch tag, detailing his adventures through trades and free agency. What does that top? Well, Derek Jeter for one. Only Adam Dunn, Stephen Strasburg and Lee himself are the only players that top that tag. Yep, that means Derek Jeter, Carl Crawford, Josh Hamilton... they've all been written about less than Lee's nomadic career.

Wow.

Lee is truly a journalist's dream, with the specter of free agency and constant trades keeping Lee at the forefront of the news. First Lee was dealt to the Phillies, and their push to the World Series provided plenty of fodder. Then you had Lee being traded to the Mariners and the head-scratching element of Philly turning around and acquiring Roy Halladay.

Lee Then the Mariners flailed, and Lee was in a tug of war between the Rangers and Yankees. With Texas, he advanced to the World Series yet again, but hit free agency and we all know how that turned out.

Lee has been a big part of baseball coverage the last two years, and especially this year as he went from the Phillies to Mariners to Rangers and back to Philadelphia. I've never quite seen a player sustain coverage this long in so many different ways.

  2. Strasmas
Cliff Lee may have dominated the off-the-field storylines, but Stephen Strasburg was a phenom on the field. He rocketed through the minors, with each of his farm starts must-see status.

Then: his debut.

Seven innings, two earned runs, no walks, 14 strikeouts -- and a whole lot of Nationals fans grinning ear to ear. He reached 100 mph on two pitches, and 34 of 94 pitches broke the 98-mph barrier.

It didn't stop there, as Strasmas blew through city after city, leaving shell-shocked players in its wake as Strasburg racked up 92 strikeouts in 68 innings over 12 starts. He posted a 2.91 ERA while walking just 17 and was an instant ace. Even a disabled-list stint in July for shoulder inflammation wasn't enough to curb the hype.

Until August 21.

Strasburg Then, Tommy John surgery showed up in Strasburg's stocking as a big lump of coal.

Strasburg was one of the most hyped pitchers of all time (David Clyde 's got nothing on this guy) and delivered with TJ surgery providing the rock bottom. And all the while, tons of ink was devoted to Strasburg. In fact, Strasburg was the most-written about player on MLB Facts and Rumors until Lee got sent to Texas.

  1. Jim Joyce blows Armando Galarraga's perfect game
What more can one say about this?

It was a brutal reminder to all that baseball simply needs instant replay. In this day and age, an "aw shucks, I messed up" isn't enough. Fans want to know that what they see on the field is legitimate. How many times do you hear about the 1985 World Series-winning Royals without the name Jorge Orta added?

How about the 1996 Yankees, who have to tote around Jeffrey Maier as part of its legacy?
Galarraga and Joyce
Imagine what would have happened in the 2004 ALCS had the original call of Mark Bellhorn's double had been upheld, as well as Alex Rodriguez's purse-slapping the ball out of Bronson Arroyo's glove?

Give Joyce credit for owning up to blowing the call and being genuinely bothered by the fact Armando Galarraga lost his shot at history on a blown call.

Give credit too, for Galarraga and the Tigers for being incredibly gracious. The actions of the two involved defused what could have been a powder-keg situation. (Just look at the picture -- talk about reconciliation.)

That doesn't change what happened, though. And what happened was this: Armando Galarraga lost a perfecto on the final out of the game in which there is irrefutable proof that the batter was out.

In the Year of the Pitcher with Lee and Strasburg as the most-talked about players and amidst the slow advent (and inevitable arrival) of expanded instant replay, it's perhaps fitting that this storyline heads the list of top storylines of the baseball season that did not make the all-inclusive Top 10 sports list, due to run on CBSSports.com next week.

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb  on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.


Posted on: August 24, 2010 12:36 pm
Edited on: August 24, 2010 2:26 pm
 

Steinbrenner to be honored in Monument Park

Monument Park George Steinbrenner will enter Yankees immortality on September 20 when his monument takes its rightful place in Monument Park.

Steinbrenner will join just five other people who have monuments -- Joe DiMaggio, Lou Gehrig, Miller Huggins, Mickey Mantle and Babe Ruth. Monuments are only awarded posthumously and clearly are a high honor -- higher than seeing your number retired for the Yankees or with a plaque adorning Monument Park.

"We know we will always share George's memory with Yankees fans everywhere, and a monument in his honor to be located in Monument Park will reflect the special connection, appreciation and responsibility that George felt for New York Yankees' fans everywhere as they were always uppermost in his mind," the Steinbrenners said in a written statement via MLB.com .

Steinbrenner's monument will be dedicated just before the night's game against the Rays. The choice of opponent is appropriate as Steinbrenner made his home in Tampa, Fla.

Steinbrenner is, of course, best known for taking a down-and-out Yankees team and returning the now-27-time World Champions atop baseball's elite. He passed away July 14 at age 80.

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .

Category: MLB
Posted on: July 22, 2010 6:23 pm
 

Yankees running out of real estate


Jorge Posada The New York Yankees will add a black armband to their uniform to honor Ralph Houk, the former New York manager and player, who died Wednesday at the age of 90.

The Yankees will add the armband to the left sleeve of the jersey, below the patch honoring former stadium announcer Bob Sheppard. The team is also wearing a patch on the left side of their chest to honor former owner George Steinbrenner.

Hopefully nobody else close to the organization dies anytime soon -- mostly because I don't want to wish death on anyone, it's just not cool, but also because one of America's classic sports uniforms is getting a little cluttered. Honestly, though, I thought the Sheppard one was nicely done, if not a little busy to go with the rest of the Yankee uniform, but doesn't the Steinbrenner patch look a little cheap? It's like one of those oval bumper stickers that used to be for European countries, but are now used for every vacation spot and bad jam band. You'd think the Yankees could do a little better. I like the plain black armband like the team's All-Stars wore at the All-Star Game in Anaheim, but that's just me. It's trivial in the big picture and nowhere near the importance of someone's life, but it'd still be nice for it to be a little more aesthetically pleasing.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

Posted on: July 16, 2010 4:39 pm
Edited on: July 16, 2010 7:41 pm
 

TBS to honor the Boss with 'Seinfeld' episodes


The Yankees are honoring George Steinbrenner tonight at Yankee Stadium, but the best tribute will come next week on TBS when the station will show 10 classic Seinfeld episodes featuring the Boss.

TBS will show 10 episodes, featuring eight of our 10-best moments from Larry David's portrayal of the Yankees owner .

From the TBS press release, here's the schedule:
Monday, July 19
7 p.m.              “The Opposite” – George convinces Steinbrenner to give him a job.
7:30 p.m.         “The Secretary” – George finds out Steinbrenner’s secretary makes more than he does.
 
Tuesday, July 20
7 p.m.              “The Race” – George heads to Cuba to recruit baseball players for Steinbrenner.
7:30 p.m.         “The Wink” – Steinbrenner lists all the people he’s fired over the years.
 
Wednesday, July 21
7 p.m.              “The Hot Tub” – Steinbrenner convinces George that a hot tub is the perfect way to relieve stress.
7:30 p.m.         “The Caddy” – George’s father (Jerry Stiller) confronts Steinbrenner about a traded player.
 
Thursday, July 22
7 p.m.              “The Calzone” – Steinbrenner gets the idea to put Yankees clothes in a pizza oven.
7:30 p.m.         “The Nap” – George’s napping habits at work lead Steinbrenner to think he has ESP.
 
Friday, July 23
7 p.m.              “The Millennium” – George does everything he can to get fired, but Steinbrenner loves what he does.
7:30 p.m.         “The Muffin Tops” – George’s relationship with the Yankees finally ends when Steinbrenner trades him.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

Category: MLB
Posted on: July 13, 2010 4:18 pm
Edited on: July 13, 2010 11:15 pm
 

Top 10 Steinbrenner moments on 'Seinfeld'

Constanza and Steinbrenner, Blogspot.com George Steinbrenner wasn't just the owner of the Yankees. He was also a pop culture sensation, guest hosting Saturday Night Live once as well as being the subject of mockery on Seinfeld , where series producer Larry David voiced the majority of Steinbrenner's cameos.

Even though Seinfeld made fun of Steinbrenner, the owner reportedly got a kick out of the parody. The famed Yankees owner passed away on Tuesday, and in remembrance of one of the most influential owners in the game's history, here's a top 10 list of Steinbrenner on Seinfeld , only one appearance of which was the actual Boss himself ("The Invitations").

10. The Nap

RECAP:
George Costanza is tired, so takes a nap under his desk. Steinbrenner comes in looking for Costanza to tell him he has finally figured out the lyrics to "Heartbreaker" by Pat Benatar and decides to remain in Costanza's office until he returns. Costanza calls Jerry Seinfeld and asks him to phone in a bomb threat, causing Steinbrenner to hide under the desk and finding Costanza. The Boss becomes convinced Costanza has ESP and knew a bomb threat would be called in. He puts Costanza in charge of Seinfeld's demand of fitted hat day for every fan, much to Costanza's chagrin as he now has to find what hat size every attendee wears.

QUOTABLE:
"You climbed under that desk because you have ESP. George, what's on my mind? ... Meatballs! Huh. Unbelievable. Anyway this terrorist had a specific demand. Not more cheap adjustable hats on hat day. He wants fitted hats just like the players wear." -- Steinbrenner to Costanza

9. The Caddy


RECAP: George Costanza goes on vacation with his girlfriend, Susan. He leaves his car in the Yankee Stadium parking lot, causing George Steinbrenner to think Costaza is putting in many hours. Costanza receives a promotion to assistant to the general manager, but then assume George is dead after his car suffers damage. Steinbrenner informs Costanza's parents, at which point the father, Frank, complains to Steinbrenner about trading Jay Buhner to the Mariners for Ken Phelps   which became a recurring gag.

QUOTABLE:
"My name is George Steinbrenner, I'm afraid I have some very sad news about your son." -- Steinbrenner to Costanza's parents

8. The Muffin Tops

RECAP: Costanza, as he is wont to do, lies to his girlfriend about having a job as a hen supervisor for Tyler Chicken after posing as a tourist in New York City. When Costanza "moves" to the city and takes a job with the Yankees to continue dating his girlfriend, Steinbrenner finds out and believes Costanza is holding down two jobs. He calls Tyler Chicken and works out a trade to send Costanza in exchange for all concessions at Yankee Stadium being turned to chicken.

QUOTABLE:
"How about this. You give me Costanza, I convert your concessions to all chicken no charge. Instead of hot dogs, chicken dogs. Instead of pretzels, chicken twists. Instead of beer, alcoholic chicken." -- John Tyler to Steinbrenner

7. The Race


RECAP: Elaine Benes' boyfriend, Ned, is a Communist and gets Costanza interested in Communism. His secretary at Yankee Stadium overhears a conversation and tells Steinbrenner that Costanza is a communist. Steinbrenner tasks Costanza with going to Cuba to find the next Cuban star who can play for the Yankees. He refers to a young pitcher named Rodriguez. Steinbrenner also orders Costanza to bring back Cuban cigars.

QUOTABLE:
"And bring me back some of those cigars in the cedar boxes, you know the ones with the fancy rings? I love those fancy rings. They kind of distract you while you're smoking. The red and yellow are nice. It looks good against the brown of the cigar. The Maduro, I like the Maduro wrapper. The darker the better, that's what I say. Of course, the Claro's good too. That's more of a pale brown, almost like a milky coffee. I find the ring size very confusing. They have it in centimeters which I don't really understand that well..." -- Steinbrenner to Costanza

6. The Invitations

RECAP:
Holding an actual appearance by Steinbrenner, the scenes were deleted before the episode aired but can be seen on DVDs of the seventh season. Steinbrenner asks Costanza to make Elaine Benes the Boss' date for Costanza's upcoming wedding. If Costanza refuses, he loses his job.

QUOTABLE:
"I don't like to put undue pressure on people." -- Steinbrenner to Costanza after successfully getting Elaine to agree to be Steinbrenner's date

5. The Jimmy


RECAP: George's boss at Yankee Stadium, Mr. Wilhelm, informs Steinbrenner that shoes and batting doughnuts have gone missing and he believes it is an inside job. Costanza is sweating heavily from playing a game of basketball and later eating spicy chicken, causing Wilhelm to believe Costanza is the culprit. Costanza is called before Steinbrenner where Costanza confuses the Boss by talking in the third person, due to playing basketball with someone who refers to himself in the third person. After Steinbrenner gets confused by Costanza's third-person talking, he switches subjects to what he has for lunch and discloses an affinity for cupcakes.

QUOTABLE:
"Well, let's see what I have today. Darn it, it's ham and cheese again and she forgot the fancy mustard. I told her I like that fancy mustard. You could put that fancy mustard on a shoe and it would taste pretty good to me -- Oh! She made it up with a cupcake though. Hey look at this -- you know I got a new system for eating these things. I used to peel off the chocolate; now I turn them upside down, I eat the cake first and save the frosting for the end." -- Steinbrenner to Costanza

4. The Calzone


RECAP: Costanza shares his eggplant calzone with Steinbrenner, which the Boss falls in love with. It then becomes a daily tradition for the two to have an eggplant calzone together, but Costanza is barred from the restaurant, Paisano's, after being caught taking money from a tip jar. The restaurant worker believes Costanza was stealing money but the notoriously cheap Costanza was only recovering some coins he mistakenly added to his tip. Steinbrenner refuses to change lunches, causing Costanza to get the calzones through Newman, who begins picking them up. One day, Newman does not work, causing Costanza to call Kramer with a request to get calzones. Kramer does so, but burns his clothes in the pizza oven after drying it off. Kramer then gets into a fight with the seller, and Kramer is kicked out without the calzones. He goes to Yankee Stadium where Steinbrenner smells Kramer's clothes and gets an idea to put the Yankees' uniforms in a pizza oven so they smell like calzones.

QUOTABLE:
"Big Stein wants an eggplant calzone." -- Steinbrenner to Costanza

3. The Secretary

RECAP: Costanza has relations with his secretary, Ada. In the heat of the moment, Costanza promises Ada a raise, and then has to request Steinbrenner give her one. He does, giving Ada a salary greater than Costanza's, much to his chagrin. He appeals to Steinbrenner, who relays a story of when he was financially strapped as well, hitchhiking to work and sitting in a bakery truck. He then gets off-track, talking about his love for cupcakes.

QUOTABLE:
"Sure, I like a cupcake every now and then, like everybody else. You know I like it when they have a little cream on the inside, it's a surprise. That's good, plus the chocolate ones are good too. Sometimes I just can’t even make up my mind. A lot of times I’ll mix the two together, make a vanilla fudge." -- Steinbrenner to Costanza

2. The Millennium

RECAP: In an attempt to get fired, Costanza wears Babe Ruth's old uniform and gets food all over it. Steinbrenner instead gets inspired and wears Lou Gehrig's pants.

QUOTABLE:
"It's exactly what the organization needed ... We wanna look to the future, we gotta tear down the past. Babe Ruth was nothing more than a fat old man, with little-girl legs. And here's something I just found out recently. He wasn't really a sultan. Ah, what d'you make of that? Hey, check this out. [he stands to reveal he's wearing baseball pants.] Lou Gehrig's pants. Not a bad fit. Hey, you don't think that nerve disease of his was contagious, do you? Uh, I better take 'em off. I'm too important to this team. [Removes the pants to reveal his boxers.] Big Stein can't be flopping and twitching." -- Steinbrenner to Costanza

1. The Wink

RECAP: Despite Costanza being culpable, his co-worker, Mr. Morgan, is fired for transgressions. Steinbrenner then recites the names of all the people he has fired to Costanza, inadvertently naming then-manager Buck Showalter as one. Showalter would go on to be fired in actuality mere weeks after the episode aired. Steinbrenner names Billy Martin four times in his list, a nod to Martin's five firings as manager under Steinbrenner.

QUOTABLE:
"You know, as painful as it is, I had to let a few people go over the years. Yogi Berra, Lou Piniella, Bucky Dent, Billy Martin, Dallas Green, Dick Houser, Bill Virdon, Billy Martin, Scott Marrow, Billy Martin, Bob Lemon, Billy Martin, Gene Michael, Buck Showalter, ... uh, tut! ... George, you didn't hear that from me. [George exits] ... George!"

Here are two YouTube clips of Larry David as Steinbrenner: Part 1 -- Part 2

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

Category: MLB
Posted on: July 13, 2010 2:13 pm
Edited on: July 13, 2010 5:00 pm
 

Yankees won't be taxed for Steinbrenner death

When a person passes away and his or her estate passes to the heirs, there is generally an estate tax levied by the government to transfer control.

This applies to the Yankees, as the death of George Steinbrenner means baseball's most successful franchise will now transition to Hank and Hal Steinbrenner -- except without an estate tax.

As Jill Schlesinger of CBS MoneyWatch notes , the tax year of 2010 does not include an estate tax, which was put in place when the Bush Administration levied tax cuts back in 2001. This means that Steinbrenner's $1.1 billion estate can pass to his heirs without penalty in the form of about $500 million payable to the government.

While the Yankees certainly aren't strapped for cash, the roughly $500 million that is saved from the lack of an estate tax can only mean that much more the team has to spend. Cliff Lee's agent must be thrilled.

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.


Category: MLB
Posted on: July 13, 2010 12:06 pm
Edited on: July 13, 2010 2:02 pm
 

Yankees paid more than Steinbrenner's invesment

George Steinbrenner bought the Yankees for a net price of $8.8 million from CBS in 1973 (it was $10 million, but then sold two parking lots back to CBS for $1.2 million). Here's a list of the 10 Yankees with base salaries more than that for just this season:

Alex Rodriguez $32 million
CC Sabathia $23 million
Derek Jeter $21 million
Mark Teixeira $20 million
A.J. Burnett $16.5 million
Mariano Rivera $15 million
Jorge Posada $13.1 million
Andy Pettitte $11.75 million
Javier Vazquez $11.5 million
Robinson Cano $9 million

Forbes magazine valued the team as worth $1.6 billion in April.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com