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Morrison gets into brief spat with Marlins writer

Posted on: August 11, 2011 1:51 pm
 
RamirezBy Evan Brunell

The Marlins' Logan Morrison and South Florida Sun-Sentinel reporter Juan C. Rodriguez had a bit of a spat Wednesday night, when Rodriguez wrote that Morrison had taken "jabs" at teammate and star shortstop Hanley Ramirez.

Morrison told Rodriguez the Marlins lack "experience and a veteran who is in the lineup every day that can be an anchor for us" in the lineup. The club has been struggling offensively, and Ramirez hitting the disabled list with a sprained left shoulder after sitting out eight straight games certainly didn't help matters.

When asked if Ramirez could be that person, Morrison added, “I guess, but he’s not there every game. It’s 162 games. It’s not a 100-game season.”

That was enough for Rodriguez to title his story "Florida Marlins OF Logan Morrison takes more jabs at DLed Hanley Ramirez," and that upset Morrison greatly, who took to Twitter to voice his complaints.

"[F]unny how u left the part out about how unfortunate it is that he was hurt and that he could be an anchor if he was healthy," he tweeted to Rodriguez, adding another note that the story "probably wouldn't have been that good of a story then! Might want to think twice about coming around my locker next time."

Let's stop for a second and appreciate how much Twitter has changed the baseball world. In the past, the only conduit to fans for players on a large scale was through the media. Now, players are not only able to go straight to the fans with Twitter, but they can take a stand for themselves if they feel they are being improperly treated. In the olden days, Morrison would have only been able to tell Rodriguez the next day not to come to his locker anymore, and the story would have swelled. Instead, Morrison fired off some tweets after reading the story and was able to defend himself to the public. Rodriguez then altered the story, telling Twitter followers that the issue had been "straightened out."

The new story added two sentences:

Morrison later clarified his comments, saying they weren’t intended as a dig at Ramirez. What he meant to convey was that the offense’s struggles sans Ramirez shows how important he is to this team.
Disaster averted, thanks to the magic that is Twitter. Any time you can make a process more public, open and transparent, that's a good thing. A chief complaint players have when they deal with the media is that the media selectively uses quotes to craft the story, painting things in a certain light that may otherwise have been unintended. In the olden days, reporters had space considerations in the newspapers, so would lop off any quotes that were extraneous or unimportant. These days, it's less of an issue given the internet has no space limitations, but as we saw, that doesn't erase the issue entirely. With the advent of social networking, though, it allows for one more check and balance.

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Comments
hotmeuly
Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 21, 2011 7:16 am
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peulouy
Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 19, 2011 1:56 am
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Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 8, 2011 2:36 pm
 

Morrison gets into brief spat with Marlins writer

Herbal legal smoking buds saved, Dugg, therefore i got into a Rss membership. Cheers!



Since: Oct 8, 2006
Posted on: August 19, 2011 1:24 pm
 

Morrison gets into brief spat with Marlins writer

Brandon Morrow and Casper Wells are another example of Twitter being used in a positive fashion.  Other than that I would have to agree with you that it's rarely been for the positive.  If I were an AD or GM I would write it into the guys contracts, compensate them,and make it understood that they aren't allowed to tweet.  Seems harsh but it's just in the best interests of the person who is usually running off their mouth.  More harm than good seems to come from it.



Since: Nov 12, 2006
Posted on: August 11, 2011 1:58 pm
 

Morrison gets into brief spat with Marlins writer

This is probably the first positive result from an athlete's twitter usage.  More often than not, it's just a vehicle for their emotional comments to be made public, and that's rarely a good thing.


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