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Strasburg Watch: Rehab start likely Sunday

Posted on: August 3, 2011 1:14 pm
Edited on: August 3, 2011 1:16 pm
 
By Matt Snyder

Stephen Strasburg threw a simulated game Tuesday and everything went well, so he's on track to begin a minor-league rehab assignment, likely Sunday. His final hurdle is a side session Thursday. Assuming everything goes well, he'd get the start for Class-A Hagerstown Sunday -- only throwing an inning or two. He would then start in the minors August 12, 17 and 22 as part of the rehab assignment (Washington Times).

This is great news for the top overall pick in the 2009 draft, as it appears he might even return before September -- more likely early September. Remember, rehab assignments are limited to 30 days, so a Sunday start would mean he has to return by the end of the first week in September.

That timing would work well for the Nats, too, because Strasburg could get in some work toward the end of the season and head into the offseason strong. Plus, Jordan Zimmermann -- another young stud pitcher for the Nats who underwent Tommy John surgery -- is nearing the Nationals' self-imposed innings limit for the season. Strasburg could just slide right into Zimmermann's spot in the rotation. Expect the Nats to similarly handle Strasburg with kid gloves when he does return to the hill.

Strasburg, 23, hasn't pitched in a game since last August 21. He had season-ending surgery on his right elbow shortly thereafter. The usual return time for the so-dubbed Tommy John procedure is between 10 and 14 months. He's reportedly been hitting the mid-90s on the radar gun in his simulated games.

Strasburg stormed onto the scene last season, going 5-3 with a 2.91 ERA, 1.07 WHIP and 92 strikeouts in 68 innings. If he can return to form, he's projected to be one of the elite pitchers in all of baseball. In fact, Strasburg and Zimmermann will form one of the better 1-2 punches in baseball for years to come, if they can remain healthy.

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Comments
hotmeuly
Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 21, 2011 11:19 am
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peulouy
Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 19, 2011 6:02 am
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Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 8, 2011 6:19 pm
 

Strasburg Watch: Rehab start likely Sunday

Pleased all of us ran across this blog, probably sure to salvage the product to are charged a nice go to see so that you can generally.



Since: Sep 18, 2006
Posted on: August 7, 2011 8:01 pm
 

Strasburg Watch: Rehab start likely Sunday

Who cares. Did anyone notice that this is a "rookie" that hasn't really proven anything?



Since: Mar 18, 2009
Posted on: August 4, 2011 12:55 am
 

Strasburg Watch: Rehab start likely Sunday

 You're damn right! Past pitchers pitched until they were told to not pitch anymore, regardless of injury. The notion that pitchers of old had it easier than pitchers of today is completely upsurd. I guarantee you that Nolan Ryan pitched hundreds of innings more than Strasburg before he was injured in his mere, first season in the big leagues. I am not saying he can't have a major league career. But his prospects as a long term power pitcher have greatly diminished.




Since: Jul 4, 2007
Posted on: August 3, 2011 11:12 pm
 

Strasburg Watch: Rehab start likely Sunday

its a different era. back in the days of bob gibson and other greats, there were never pitch counts and inning limits. todays pitchers have been pampered since high school to be able to pitch every 5th day and throw 100 pitches every start. nolan ryan never had to worry about pitch counts, he pitched until he was pulled.
and to the guy who said he would never be the same because of tommy john: get educated. tommy john is much more successful now than it was 20 years ago, or even 10 years ago. its hardly the death sentence it is thought to be.



Since: Mar 18, 2009
Posted on: August 3, 2011 10:45 pm
 

Strasburg Watch: Rehab start likely Sunday

But that still doesn't explain how power pitchers like Ryan and Clemens can pitch 20 or more years and stay relatively healthy, yet pitchers like Stratsburg can't make a single season without a major major injury. Hell if anything, it works the other way, even lower level coaches rest their pitchers more now. When Ryan and Clemens were pitching in little league/High School, you bet your azz, they put many more miles on their arms than the cuddled pitchers of today do. Hell Major League pitchers used to not even have pitch limits, if anything, the argument works the other way around. Pitchers today have it easier than pitchers of old.



Since: Aug 29, 2006
Posted on: August 3, 2011 8:45 pm
 

Strasburg Watch: Rehab start likely Sunday

People get hurt, dont think for a second they are not overpitched. I doubt old time pitchers grew up in routine like these players nowadays do. 50-100 years ago baseball was barely a high school sport and most schools did not have it. Pee-wees forget it. Junior and Little league as well. Old time pitchers by the time they were 18 had one million less miles on their arms than any college pitcher today. That factors in, throwing fastballs annually from 5 years old can stress any muscle, ligament, tendon and bone.



Since: Aug 3, 2007
Posted on: August 3, 2011 6:20 pm
 

Strasburg Watch: Rehab start likely Sunday

Don't forget his teammate, Jordan Zimmermann.



Since: Jun 3, 2010
Posted on: August 3, 2011 3:45 pm
 

Strasburg Watch: Rehab start likely Sunday

"Players nowadays" like Justin Verlander, Jered Weaver, Roy Halladay and CC Sabathia?

Also, plenty of pitchers have come back strong after Tommy John surgery, like Chris Carpenter, John Smoltz, A.J. Burnett, Shaun Marcum, Francisco Liriano, Billy Wagner, Ryan Vogelsong and .... yeah, Tommy John.

- Matt


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